Course Descriptions


American Studies
257 Fenton Hall
SUNY Fredonia
Fredonia, NY 14063
(716) 673-3848

AMST202 Introduction to American Studies

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures, their historical development and contemporary status. Focusing on literary and cultural representations of specific aspects of the American experience, the course will examine the constructed nature of American self-perceptions and of U.S. history. The course contextualizes U.S. cultures within the Americas and the global arena. Particular course emphasis is selected by the instructor.
Cross-listed as ENGL 200

AMST210 American Popular & Mass Cultures

An introduction to the methodologies of studying American cultures, with a special focus on popular and mass cultures. Particular course emphasis will be determined by the individual instructor, but topics will stress the multiplicity of American cultures. While literary works will make up the majority of class texts, the course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach integrating materials from fields such as history, anthropology, women's studies, ethnic studies, geography, sociology, music, art, among others.
Cross-listed as ENGL 208

AMST215 Holidays and American Culture

This course will examine the invention, celebration, and meanings of American holidays from the colonial era to the present. Issues to be considered include the ways in which holidays have shaped cultural values and American identity and vice versa; the ways in which holidays have both reflected and shaped views of gender, race, class, and ethnicity; and the relationships between holidays and religious belief, nationalism, consumer culture and political ideology. The course will take a multicultural and interdisciplinary approach.
Cross-listed as HIST 215

AMST289 Comparative North America

A survey of North American history that employs the methodology of comparative history to interpret the histories of the United States, Canada, and Mexico within a conceptual framework sensitive to continental similarities and differences. The course takes a thematic approach, and special attention is given to the political institutions and economic structures that have fostered transnational cooperation and continental integration. The social and cultural dimensions of discord and conflict also are examined.
Cross-listed as HIST 289

AMST296 American Identities

An exploration of the historical construction of American gender, ethnicity/race, and class, their present status, and their literary and cultural representations. Focusing on intersections between these categories of identity, the course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach, integrating materials from fields such as literary studies, history, women's studies, ethnic studies, geography, sociology, music, and art.
Cross-listed as ENGL 296

AMST338 19th Century American Culture

Examines how social, political, and economic changes have affected American culture and Americans' lives. Topics include consumption patterns; recreational activities; architectural styles; high and popular culture; holidays; family life; and social and cultural rituals.
Cross-listed as HIST 338

AMST340 20th Century American Culture

Examines how social, political, and economic changes have affected American culture and Americans' lives. Topics include consumption patterns; recreational activities; architectural styles; high and popular culture; holidays; family life; and social and cultural rituals.
Cross-listed as HIST 339

AMST347 United States Immigration

Immigration to the U.S., with an emphasis on comparing the experiences of European, African, Latin American, and Asian immigrants. Topics will include immigrants' lives, work,and communities; assimilation and cultural persistence; and the development of U.S.immigration policy.
Cross-listed as HIST 347

AMST 399 Special Topics

Variable-content course. Consult Course Offerings Bulletin and program notices for specific topic covered each semester. In recent semesters, special topics have included "Sustainability and America," "19th Century American Women Writers," "Frontiers in American Literature," "American Religious History," "Environmental History in North America," and "American Literary Landmarks."

AMST400 Concepts/Methods of American Studies

Development of American Studies as a discipline; current splits in concepts and methods of American Studies; practice in making imaginative connections among elements in American culture and testing these connections by appropriate methods.

AMST401 Independent Study

Intensive individual study of some aspect of American Studies involving production of paper or project. Request for enrollment must be made prior to registration in the form of a written proposal, signed by the supervising faculty member, and forwarded to the Coordinator of American Studies.

AMST402 Senior Project

Clearly defined independent project utilizing methods and materials of American Studies, culminating in complete written report and analysis. Variable credit to allow internships, study abroad, and similar field projects. Before registration, student must submit detailed description of proposed project, approved by the faculty member(s) who will supervise it, to American Studies Coordinator with request for specific number of credit hours.

 


Page modified 8/4/14