Department of
Computer and Information Sciences


Department of Computer and Information Sciences
Prof. Reneta Barneva, Chair
2148 Fenton Hall
The State University of New York at Fredonia
Fredonia, NY 14063
Ph: 716-673-4750
Fax: 716-673-4821

Computer and Information Sciences Office:
716-673-4820

Department News & Highlights

 

Four students majoring in Computer and Information Sciences Julian Anjorin, Mohamed Sadek, Mitchell Skomra, and Daniel Sturniolo went to a Summer School at Jiaotong University of Beijing, China on a scholarship covering their tuition, room, and board, and for three of them even their airfare. More information can be found here.

Students going to China

 

 

Dr. Barneva published a book with Springer in co-authorship with Valentin Brimkov and Josef Slapal. The volume entitled "Combinatorial Image Analysis" constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 16th International Workshop on Combinatorial Image Analysis, IWCIA 2014, held in Brno, Czech Republic, in May 2014. The 20 revised full papers and 3 invited papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions. The topics covered include discrete geometry and topology in imaging science, new results in image representation, segmentation, grouping, and reconstruction, medical image processing.

BookBarneva 2014

 

Dr. Singh's abstract "Engaging and Educating Information Systems and Computer Science Learners in Virtual World" was accepted at the 8th Annual Teaching and Learning Conference: Framing the Future: Teaching, Learning, Advancing, which will be held at Fredonia on August 18, 2014.

 

Dr. Barneva served as co-advisor of the doctoral student Bilyana Stoynova who successfully defended her thesis on May 22, 2014. Dr. Stoynova is an assistant professor at the Technical University, Gaborvo.

 

Paul Frey, a 2010 alum, who graduated with a major in Computer Science and a minor in GIS has accepted a job offer with Google to handle their aerial imagery acquisitions. He will be moving to their headquarters in Mountain View, California. Currently, he is the Lead GIS Analyst for Rochester Gas and Electric. Prior to that, he was the director of GIS for Cattaraugus County.

This is the second recent alumnus who works for Google after Devin Grady who graduated in 2008 from The State University of New York at Fredonia and got a Ph.D. degree from Rice University in 2013.

 

Collin Preston was elected as a President of the CS Club.

 

The Annual High School Contest organized by Prof. Szocki was held on May 19, 2014. Prof. Olson gave an inspirational talk why everyone should be educated about contemporary technology. Dr. Tsetse conducted the Web Programming Contest, Dr. Singh - the Spreadsheet Contest, Prof. Olson - the Programming Contest, and Prof. Decker and Dr. Singh - the Scavenger Hunt. The Quiz Show, conducted by Prof. Szocki with the help of Dr. Tsetse and Prof. Decker, was as usual a lot of fun.

President Horvath visited all contests and gave stimulating talks to the students. Dean's Office provided the delicious breakfast and lunch.

The High School Contest is a wonderful annual event which helps us make computer and information sciences popular among high school students.

High School Contest 2014

 

 

The CS Team scored second among all SUNY schools at the programming contest held at the Consortium of Computing Sciences in Colleges – North Eastern Region, on April 25 and 26 at Providence College, RI.

CS Team

Pictured above are Jeffrey Swift - a senior from Livonia, the CS Team coach - Dr. Gurmukh Singh, and Nicholas Freville - a junior from Mayville. The third member of the team - Patrick Hodge - a junior from Fredonia is not pictured.

More information can be found here.

 

Basar Koc a former student in the department defended successfully his master's degree thesis at the University of Miami. Dr. Arnavut served on his master's thesis committee.

 

Dr. Singh's article entitled "Azimuthal structure of charged particle emission in 28Si-Ag/Br interaction at 14.5A GeV and 32S-Ag/Br interaction at 200A GeV", in collaboration with P. Mali, A. Mukhopadhyay, and S. Sarkar, has been accepted for publication in the International Journal of Modern Physics, Vol. E143, 2014.

 

Dr. Zubairi got two awards: $1,000 individual development award for participating in IEEE CTS conference to be held May 20-23 in Minneapolis as publication chair, workshop chair and author and presenter and $1,000 Faculty creativity and research award for summer research.

 

Department faculty are staying current with the new software and instructional techniques. On March 26, 2014 Dr. Barneva, Nazarenko, Singh, Tsetse, and Prof. Decker participated in a Workshop offered by Centage Learning about Skills Assessment Manager (SAM), "an interactive online learning environment that helps students master Microsoft Office skills and computer concepts that are essential to academic and career success. SAM engages students in self-paced learning of Microsoft Office applications – including Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Windows, Internet Explorer, and Outlook, as well as technology concepts and issues."

It is meant to reduce student's expenses for hard copy textbooks and provide a simulated Microsoft Office environment, through which "the computer novices and experienced users are able to practice Microsoft Office tasks at the skill level that is most appropriate for them – from an observation mode that allows students to watch the task being completed before tackling it on their own, to an apply mode that allows students to complete the task without guidance and receive feedback. With SAM Projects, students apply their skills to creating real-world projects, such as flyers, budgets, and presentations."

"A student study guide report provides personalized remediation, linking students back to simulated practice of skills they have not yet mastered and to the related section of the e-book for additional information."

 

Dr. Arnavut has been invited to be a co-chair of the 11th International Conference HONET 2014 which will be held December 15-17, 2014 and hosted by UNC Charlotte with the co-Sponsorship of Charlotte Research Institute (CRI) and Technical Sponsorship of IEEE.

HONET 2014's main theme is "Photonics for Energy (PfE)" along with its legacy scope spanning all communication technologies, networks, security and e-applications as well as emerging/enabling technologies.

Congratulations!

 

On March 26, 2014, Dr. Wenliang (Kevin) Du from EECS Department, Syracuse University visited the department and gave a talk entitled "Enhancing the Security of Android Phones," a topic that is very important in light of the pervasive use of Android smartphones.

In his talk Dr. Du first gave a brief tutorial on smartphone security, covering some of the key security features in iOS and Android, as well as how they can be attacked. Then he focused on the research problems that he is trying to solve with his graduate students. Dr. Du also gave information and distributed materials about the graduate programs at Syracuse University. Dean Kijinski introduced the speaker, whose lecture was very well attended by students and faculty from CIS Department and all campus.

After the talk there was there was pizza and drinks arranged by Prof. Olson and plenty of lively conversation. Many students got inspired by Dr. Du's talk to pursue a career in computer security or to continue their studies at graduate level.

 

Prof. Olson's course on Hacking, Surveillance, and Privacy was approved as an honor course. Congratulations!

The course will examine the many of the societal issues and concerns related to the pervasive integration of computer technology into our everyday lives. Students will be taught basic principles of IT and networking which will be quickly expanded on through the presentation of open-source, freely available computer security tools. Through tightly controlled demonstrations, students will learn why hackers frequently say that computer security is a fiction. Once students have a foundation in the mechanisms used by hackers to circumvent security, discussions will shift to a focus on the societal questions surrounding computer security such as the relationship between computer security and free speech, technological surveillance, cyber war, and privacy.

 

Prof. Olson and his students in the course CSIT 463: Introduction to Digital Image Processing and Computer Vision developed a music visualization tool. No MIDI files were used and each pixel is being drawn via code. The height of each bubble is determined by the frequency of the note being played and the size of each bubble is determined by the duration of the note being played. Coded in C# using Visual Studio 2012. Click on the image to see the video.

Special Thanks To: Eugene Nicks (For music translation), Donald Abdullah-Robinson (For writing an awesome drawing algorithm), Mark Mackey and Jeffrey Swift (For some great ideas realized later on).

Musical Project

 

Dr. Gurmukh Singh in co-authorship with P. Mali, A. Mukhopadhyay and S. Sarkar published the article "Wavelet analysis of shower track distribution in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions" in the Journal of Advances in High Energy Physics, Research ID 759176, Vol. 2013, 1-13 (2013). The paper employs the technique of continuous wavelets to discover patterns in relativistic energy nuclear collisions from experiments conducted at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Upton, NY and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland. The technique of continuous wavelets has also been used to recognize patterns in data communications. Wavelet technique (also called wavelet theory or just wavelets) has also attracted much attention during recent years in signal processing. Althouh it is not a new theory in a sense that many of the ideas and techniques involved in wavelets (sub-band coding, quadrature mirror filters, etc.) were developed independently in various signal processing applications, it has been successfully employed in a number of practical applications such as transient signal analysis, image analysis, communications systems, and other signal processing fields.

 

Two computer and information sciences students, Nicholas Freville and Adam Toth have assembled a Beowulf cluster, comprised of three tiny computers called Raspberry Pi's, that work in tandem to solve complex problems.

With 512 MB of memory, each computer – about the size of a credit card and encased in a hard plastic case -- is as powerful as a smart phone, Toth explained. There is no keyboard, but these devices can perform a variety of functions when hooked up to a monitor and keyboard.

A Beowulf cluster is a parallel computing system achieved by linking normally identical, commodity-grade computers into a small local area network (LAN). The result gives a huge boost of power despite using inexpensive, personal computer hardware.

"These computers are not high-performance machines, but when clustered together, their performance is boosted," explained Dr. Junaid Zubairi, who supervised the class project undertaken by Toth and Freville.

The news was featured in the Campus Report. More can be found here.

Beowulf cluster

 

Dr. Juanid Zubairi received an Instructional Incentive Award for over $1000. Congratulations!

 

Dr. John Hansen designed a communication system for satellite launched into orbit. The Minotaur I rocket launched by NASA from its Virginia facility in November is carrying a unique satellite that will communicate using a digital interface system designed by Dr. Hansen.

The rocket was carrying its main payload and 29 miniature satellites ("picosats") including the CAPE-2 satellite, which was constructed by students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. In order to provide digital data communications, CAPE-2 contained an onboard system designed by Hansen. The satellite measures just 10 cm (4 inches) on each side and weighs just over two pounds. It is capable of converting text to speech, tweeting, sending email, repeating voice messages, transferring files and collecting data from buoys in the Gulf of Mexico.

Dr. Hansen's digital data interface system, called "TNC-X" has been used in digital communications systems in over 40 countries, often to support first responder teams preparing for disaster situations. For the Cape-2 project, Dr. Hansen modified the design so it would be appropriate for use in orbit. TNC-X interfaces with the on-board computer and the satellite's radio to provide a command and control interface to the ground command station as well as transmit telemetry, and digital communications such as email and tweets.

Dr. Hansen offers a course on Programming for Embedded Microcontrollers in which the students build a series of embedded projects of increasing complexity. He is a recipient of Teacher of the Year department Award.

From Campus Report

satellite 

 

Prof. Robert Olson gave a workshop on C# to department faculty. He presented many features, including work with linked lists, applications for image processing and software he developed for data mining. The faculty enjoyed the workshop and found the applications very useful for their professional development.

Robert Olson Workshop

 

The Department alumna Georgie Fu gave a keynote address at the recognition ceremony of the The State University of New York at Fredonia chapter of Golden Key International Honour Society which was held Nov. 10, 2013 at the Williams Center Multipurpose Room. Georgie Fu is a 2012 summa cum laude graduate, SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence recipient, and a former Golden Key chapter president. She was featured by the Campus Report.

Georgie Fu

 
 

The Department of Computer and Information Sciences became 10 year old! Prof. Cole invited the faculty to get together and celebrate the event at Applebees.

Faculty party

 

On October 12-13, 2013 six students from the department participated in the programming competition HackUpstate, sponsored by Syracuse University and SUNY Oswego and hosted at the Syracuse Technology Garden. The goal of the competition is to build the best product possible in only 24 hours and then give a presentation on it. Students from nine colleges, including Fredonia, attended as well as many professionals from various corporations. The NYS Chief Technology Officer attended all the presentations given.

In 24 hours Aaron Chan, Daniel Coffaro, Nicholas Freville, Jason Guy, Jeffrey Swift, and Robert Szkutak built a web-based video game in HTML5, CSS, and Javascript. They wrote tools to help them develop the algorithms of the game in C++. They also used PHP code hosted on the department student server Pizza to have the game send a text message to the cell phone of the person playing the game.

The presentation of the team is available here. The news was featured by Syracuse local newspapers. More information about the contest is available here.

Hackathon

 

On October 4, 2013 the department held a Student-Faculty Party. It was attended by more than 40 students who mingled with the faculty and conversed informally. Drs. Barneva, Nazarenko, Tsetse; Profs. Cole, Malayny, Olson, Szocki, and Ms. Austin took part in it. They presented their scholarship and courses to the students. A special guest was Associate Dean Roger Byrne. He talked about the role of sciences in today's education, about the ever-changing area of Computer and Information Sciences, and the innovative courses the department offers. The President of the CS Club, Rob Szkutak, talked about the club activities. Prof. Cole was honored for a third time in a row with the Best Teacher of the Year Department Award. Everyone enjoyed the refreshments and the pizza provided by the main organizer - Prof. Szocki.

Fall 2013 Party

 

On October 3, 2013, Prof. Jan Pavlik from the Institute of Mathematics of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic visited the department and gave a talk on "Pareto Optimality and Its Geometric Applications." He explained the general principle of Pareto Optimality as a property of significance with respect to binary relations. Then, he showed how this universal tool can be used for description and analysis of various situations. He showed some examples and an instance of the principle in geometry. Its further investigation leads to various results which can be possibly applied in geography and related sciences.

Jan Pavlik

 

The students Zachary Daily, Brian Rashty, Justin Soderberg and Robert Szkutak and Profs. Malayny and Olson created a program concept designed to combat bullying in classrooms by allowing teachers to collect data about bullying incidents throughout the school – data which can be used to alter classroom layouts to lessen the likelihood of a reoccurrence. They presented a paper at The 6th International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2013) which was very well received. Their work is featured at The Statement Magazine.

Malayny-Olson Conference

 

Dr. Singh (together with Ashwini Kumar and B. K. Singh) published the article "Systematic study of multiparticle production in nucleus-nucleus interactions at 14.6 A GeV, in the Journal of Physics, Indian Academy of Sciences, Vol. 80(1), 103-1115 (2013).

 

Dr. Barneva gave a keynote talk "Education in computer science and the role of the teacher in the environment of open educational resources" at the 6th ESRI Conference "The Education and Scientific Research in the Information Society" which was held in Plovdiv, Bulgaria May 30-31, 2013. The conference was sponsored by the Association for the Development of Information Society, The Institute of Mathematics and Informatics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, and the University of Plovdiv "Paisii Hilendarski."

Open Educational Resources (OER) are a new phenomenon that may significantly impact higher education and the occupation of university professors. On the other hand, OER have a number of advantages, including adaptive learning and an automatic analysis of the learning process data that may lead to improvement of the curriculum. Dr. Barneva examined the current state-of-art in higher education and the related problems. She shared her reflections on the impact of the new means on the education in general and on the education in computer science and its specifics, in particular. Her work has been featured in Campus Report.

Barneva keynote talk

 

The new edition of the High School Contest was held on May 20, 2013. Fifty eight high school students from six regional schools participated in the event. There were contests in programming, spreadsheets, web design and a scavenger hunt. Many department faculty and students were involved. Prof. Szocki provided the overall organization and logistics, served as a coordinator and judge of the quiz show and photographer, Dr. Arnavut served as Scavenger Hunt judge, Dr. Barneva gave a presentation to teachers, Dr. Singh wrote the questions of Excel contest and served as a judge, Prof. Decker served as judge of the HTML contest and quiz show, Prof. Olson wrote the questions for the programming contest and served as a judge. Four student helpers were also involved: Jessica Niemi served as Excel judge and photographer, John Malayny wrote the HTML questions and served as judge, Patrick Hodge and Robert Szkutak served as HTML judges, and Profs. Cole and Pingitore served as high school student coaches and brought teams. The event was sponsored by Dean's Office. Some pictures of the event are below.

HSC 2013

 

On May 18, 2013 the Commencement was held. This year the graduating class was unusually large: over 30 students graduated in Spring 2013 and 15 in Fall'12.

Commencement 2013

 

As every year the department held its Honors and Graduation party at the end of the year. The following students were honored:
Andrew Cavaretta - Maytum scholarship
Collin Preston - John Beck scholarship
Andrew Morrison - Maytum scholarship
Aaron Chan - Feng Chiang scholarship
Amanda Sutter - Debbie J.Joy scholarship
Robert Szkutak - Maytum scholarship
Jaikub Smith - Maytum scholarship
Nicholas Freville - Maytum scholarship

Honors and Graduation Party

 

Prof. Olson and the students Zach Daily, John Malayny, and Rob Szkutak have the paper "Project CASSI: A Social-Graph Based Tool for Classroom Behavior Analysis and Optimization" accepted to the 2013 International Conference on Educational Data Mining (EDM 2013, https://sites.google.com/a/iis.memphis.edu/edm-2013-conference/) in Memphis.

 

The University Student Research and Creativity Exposition was held on May 2, 2013. The department presented 18 projects developed by 19 students:

A Study of Rubik’s Cube and Its Implementation
Efe Alacamli, mentor Dr. Arnavut

A Study of Rubik’s Cube and Its Implementation
Efe Alacamli, mentor Dr. Arnavut

Survey of Biometric Recognition Systems
Namik Berk Cakmak, mentor Dr. Arnavut

Shortest Path Algorithms for Robotic AI
Erdinc Masat, mentor Dr. Arnavut

Distributed BACI Race Simulation
Richard Parenti, mentor Dr. Junaid Zubairi

Career Opportunities in Computer and Information Sciences
Efe Alacamli, Erdinc Masat, mentor Dr. Barneva

Developing Flight Routing Module for Distributed Flight Tracker
Richard Parenti, Jeffrey Lewandowski, mentor Dr. Junaid Zubairi

Applying K-means Clustering to the Social Graphs of Student Classrooms
Robert Szkutak, mentor Prof. Olson

Evaluating Classroom Diversity Using Social Networking Analysis
Zach Daily, mentor Prof. Olson

CASSI: Development of an Efficient Classroom Sorting Heuristic
John Malayny, mentor Prof. Olson

Web Interface for Education Decision Support System
Justin Soderberg, mentor Prof. Olson

Disk and System Performance with Bonnie++ and Nbench
Mark Mackey, mentor Dr. Junaid Zubairi

3G Sensor Transmission
Daniel Coffaro, Robert Lavin, mentor Dr. Junaid Zubairi

Interactive Applications of MS Excel and MS Visual Studio .NET 2010
Brandon Artymowycz, mentor Dr. Gurmukh Singh

Simulation of a Projectile and Random Theory of Rolling Dice
Timothy Aselin, mentor Dr. Gurmukh Singh

Game Programming,
Jeffrey Swift, Nicholas Freville, Patrick Hodge, mentor Dr. Gurmukh Singh

Algorithm Development to Investigate Compatibility of Three Software Systems
Ankit Ahuja, mentor Dr. Gurmukh Singh

Monitoring Users and Internet Service Providers for Fair Use
Ankit Ahuja, mentor Dr. Junaid Zubairi

Processor Scheduler Simulator
Kyle Smolinski, Ankit Ahuja, mentor Dr. Junaid Zubairi

Student Expo 2013

Some memorable moments.

 

The paper "Lossless Compression of Dithered Images" of Dr. Ziya Arnavut and the former double major in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems Basar Koc was accepted for publication in IEEE Photonics Journal.

 

On April 11-13, 2013, the CS Programming Team participated in the CCSC North East programming contest led by Dr. Singh. Prof. Olson mentored two student works accepted for presentation at student poster session at CCSCNE.

CCSCNE

Pictured from left to right: The CS Team and its mentor Dr. Gurmukh Singh, Nicholas Freville, Jeff Swift, Patrick Hodge. Zach Daily presents his poster.

 

On March 26, 2013, members of the Silver Creek Cub Scout Pack 252 visited the department of Computer and Information Sciences. The scouts earned the Computer Belt Loop and Computer Academic Pin by completing a series of required activities and had the chance to get acquainted with Fredonia computer facilities. The activities the scouts did under the guidance of Prof. Greg Cole can be found at http://meritbadge.org/wiki/index.php/Cub_Scout_Computers.

 Cub Scouts visiting the department

Pictured from left to right at the front line: David Sheldon, Jeffrey Brown, Faith Sheldon, Nico Crino, and in the back Mr. Greg Cole, and Trevor Cole.

 

 

On March 22, 2013, Ms. Amy Leclair, Fredonia's Coordinator of Advising and Liberal Arts,  gave an advising workshop to the department advisors. "According to the National Study of Student Engagement in 2005, the quality of academic advising is the single, most powerful predictor of satisfaction with the campus environment at 4-year colleges," Ms. Leclair said. She considered various topics, including advising students with academic difficulties and international students.

 Advising Workshop March 22, 2013

The department understands that advising is a team effort and takes undergraduate student advising very seriously. Faculty were excited to learn new information and how to handle some special cases. 

 

 

On March 8, 2013, Dr. Daisuke Hara gave a talk at a join department seminar and CS Club meeting entitled "A Probabilistic Approach to the Syllable Formation of Japanese Sign Language." Dr. Hara is a professor at Toyota Technological Institute - Japan. He got his Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago under the mentorship of the famous professor John A. Goldsmith. He is the author of several publications in the field of linguistics.

Daisuke Hara talk

The talk was attended by Drs. Barneva, Singh, Profs. Olson, Szocki, and several students.

 

 

On March 2, 2013, faculty and students of the Department of Computer and Information Sciences participated in the first Science Day organized by the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Barneva presented the programs and Dr. Zubairi gave a talk on Cyber Security. The President of the CS Club, Rob Szkutak, spoke about student experience on campus and about his research. Nick Freville presented his work with Blender on infinite cities for the purposes of game development.

Science Day

 

 

Dr. Singh has his work "Developmental Education through Digital Technologies and Techniques in Natural Sciences" accepted as a poster presentation at the 22nd Annual Conference on Instruction & Technology (CIT 2013) to be held May 21-24, 2013 on the campus of SUNY IT, Utica, NY. He has been awarded a scholarship by the SUNY Faculty Advisory Council on Teaching & Technology (FACT2) and the CIT Planning Committee, toward the conference registration.

 

Dr. Barneva served as invited speaker at the 15th International Conference "Humans and Computers" held on February 11-12, 2013 at the University of Shizuoka, Japan. The conference attracted participants from three continents - America, Asia, and Europe. There were two sessions in satellite sites – at the University of Aizu, Japan and Düsseldorf University of Applied Science, Germany.

Dr. Barneva's talk was on Space and Time Efficient Algorithms in Imaging Sciences. Currently, due to the expansion of digital image acquisition, there exist large databases and digital warehouses of images in medicine, security, geosciences, astronomy, metallurgy, and many other fields. In order to take maximal advantage of these huge databases, time- and space-efficient algorithms are required. She considered some examples of such algorithms in imaging sciences. More information can be found in the Campus Report.

Dr. Barneva gives an invited talk

 

 

Prof. Mendez received a grant from Carnahan Jackson Foundation to develop free textbook for the students in the courses Web Programming I and II. The grantor's desire is to save students money on textbooks purchase and make the courses more affordable. Prof. Mendez is with the department since 2008 and he has been teaching the courses on web programming very successfully in a traditional classroom or online.

Highlights 2012

Highlights 2011

Highlights 2010


Page modified 7/15/14