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The Spring 2000 Mid-Term Exam

Here is a virtual replica of the mid-term exam (minus, of course, the passages to be IDed in Part I; if I were to tell you what they were, I'd be forced to kill you).

EN 209: Novels and Tales.................Mid-Term Examination............... Spring 2000 (Simon)

NAME: __________________ ................................................... DATE: ______________

Part I: PASSAGE IDENTIFICATIONS (14 points; recommended time: 5 minutes)

Choose seven (7) of the eleven (11) passages that are listed at the end of this exam and identify both the author and title of each. Errors will be penalized for answers in this section (including spelling errors); partial credit will be awarded. Please fill out your answers to Part I below.

PASSAGE NUMBER..................................AUTHOR......................................TITLE
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

For extra credit, you may try to identify the author and title for the other passages. Errors will not be penalized for answers in this section; credit will be awarded only to exact identifications of author or title. Try for extra credit on Part I only AFTER completing Part II.

PASSAGE NUMBER....................................AUTHOR....................................TITLE
h.
i.
j.
k.

PART II: INTERPRETIVE SKILLS (48 points; recommended time: 45 minutes)

Demonstrate your competence in the following interpretive skills:

A. Do a brief close reading of a passage (different from the passage chosen for B. or C.): write one to four paragraphs on its meaning and the means by which that meaning is disclosed, with the goal of explaining what is happening in the passage, both on the level of plot/character (actions/motivations) and on the level of language use (imagery, symbolism, tone, etc.).

B. Briefly relate a passage (different from the passage chosen for A. or C.) to the work from which it comes: write one to four paragraphs on its significance, on the ways in which it contributes to the meaning of the larger work.

C. Briefly compare/contrast a passage (different from the passage chosen for A. or B.) to a work by a different author: write one to four paragraphs on a single "issue" (for example, conflict/theme/problem/process/idea) that the passage addresses, noting similarities and differences between the treatment of it in the passage and the treatment of that "issue" in another work, and trying to identify what is distinctive and significant about each author's treatment of that "issue."

Read all your answers over again before handing in your exam. Give yourself time to plan your approach to the exam; time spent planning what you will write in Part II is time well spent. Relax, focus, and enjoy yourself.

PART III: SHORT ANSWER/INTERPRETIVE ESSAY (38 points; 3 take-home essays)

A. SHORT ANSWER (10 points)

Choose two (2) of the following options on which to write short answer essays (roughly a paragraph or two each).


B. INTERPRETIVE ESSAY (28 points)

Choose one (1) of the following options on which to write a short interpretive essay (no more than two single-spaced typed/printed pages). Your task here is to let me understand your position. It is better to be reasonable (evidenced and persuasive and thoughtful) than "right" (to select an "answer"). You may even discover that your "answer" is your opening sentence and all the rest (the important stuff) is justification/explanation. You may assume I am familiar with the texts, so keep plot summary and other scene-setting devices to an absolute minimum.





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EN 209: Novels and Tales, Spring 2000
Created: 2/28/00, 9:27 pm
Last modified: 3/2/00, 7:57 pm