College-To-Career Timeline

English Works

College-to-career timeline

 

FRESHMAN YEAR

Declare the major

Presumably, if in possession of this timeline, you’ve already chosen English as your major. The next step is to go to the Registrar’s Office (located in Reed Library) and fill out a form to declare the major.

Start the process of deciding your minor

Your first semester is the time to research your options; there’s no rush to declare a minor just yet! Narrow your interests down to a few fields and try out relevant courses to each.

  • The writing minor is always an option through the English Department, especially for those with a focus in fiction or poetry writing, but make sure to cover your bases before you make a decision. Interdisciplinary skills are crucial in many industries, so play into your strengths!
  • Consider which classes interest you as you start to engage in General Education (CCC) coursework. Make sure to expand your search to include majors and minors through the Interdisciplinary Studies program such as Ethnic Studies, Women’s & Gender Studies and International Studies. Ambitious students may be urged to choose more than one minor/major, depending on the individual’s skills and goals.

QUESTIONS TO ASK:

  • How does this discipline complement the study of English?
  • What are some possible fields that I could go into with this focus?
  • How will this minor make my writing more credible?

Stay on track: You’ll probably be taking ENGL 100 as a Basic Communication course in your first semester. Second semester you should take ENGL 106, Introduction to the English Major.

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Pave the way for your minor

As you work through General Education courses, think about advanced work in fields that require introductory-level pre-requisites. Take the intro courses for CCC; this will make your minor path much easier.

Gain enjoyable, hands-on experience

Think about how extra-curricular activities that interest you might complement your major or minor interests: there’s no substitute for hands-on practice working on the campus newspaper or other media, or getting involved with groups in the Center for Multicultural Affairs that give you insight into other cultures, genders and ethnicities.

Pick the brains of your mentors

Have meaningful conversations with your advisor—that’s why they are there! Tell your advisor what you’re thinking about studying and ask for recommendations for courses, groups, etc. Talking with an advisor or mentor can be a great way to brainstorm possible careers and outline the possible steps needed to build on knowledge and experience.

Explore international options

The world you’re graduating into is not an English-only world. This is the time to start developing some fluency in another language. Don’t be satisfied with the bare minimum required by the CCC: keep taking Spanish or other languages through the “conversation” level and consider study abroad in non-English speaking countries. This is your future—Don’t rely on people to tell you what’s going on because you can’t speak the language!

Start to think about whether study abroad and internships might be in your future plans: it’s NEVER too early to get basic information from the Career Development Office or International Education Center. Take a look at the websites for these offices and get some information from your advisor.

QUESTIONS TO ASK:

  • Which general courses have most interested me?
  • What country would offer the best study abroad opportunities to complement my major and minor?

JUNIOR YEAR

Use your breaks to gain experience

Junior year is a critical time for internships, extra-curriculars and significant work in your major as well as your minor(s). Make sure to use summers and other breaks productively: don’t waste them away at a minimum wage job when you could be gaining invaluable experience!

Research more advanced degrees

Does your ultimate career goal include advanced study? This is the year, especially summer before senior year, to investigate MA or other professional programs. Look into programs that interest you and talk with your advisor about which next steps to take.

Network in Honor Societies  

Think about Honor Societies you might be eligible to join: Golden Key, Sigma Tau Delta and others have national and international networks including journals, conferences and driven peers that can help with career connections and networking.

QUESTIONS TO ASK:

  • Do I see myself furthering my education? Which potential programs stand out? What do they look for in an applicant?
  • What would be my dream internship? Are there any local businesses in a similar industry?
  • Which campus groups offer the most opportunities for me? What do I bring to the table as a member of each?

Stay on track: Make sure to join at least one relevant club or organization. Build upon your experience in any ways that you can. This is the time to add to your résumé and develop your voice as a writer for a variety of audiences. Think about which areas you’d like to learn more about and get involved while there’s still time!

Stay focused and start planning

SENIOR YEAR

By this time, you’ve developed multiple paths toward a successful transition from college to career because of planning, strategic coursework and extra/co-curricular activities. Have fun but stay focused, too! Start thinking about who might be good people to ask for letters of recommendation for graduate programs or jobs and set up a Credentials File with the Career Development Office.

Tie up any loose ends

Make sure that you’re in a senior seminar and portfolio completion class and that your portfolio is complete! It’s time to gather writing examples and revel in all of the hard work you’ve done.

Highlight your writing, editing and researching skills

Consider creating a blog for your freelance projects in writing, editing, researching and other related fields. This can be a great place to showcase the work you’ve done—art students need a portfolio to show their skills; think of this as a collection of your writing masterpieces. Blog frequently and add new content that’s relevant to the audience that you’re trying to attract.

QUESTIONS TO ASK:

  • What writing/editing/researching assignments am I most proud of? How could the skills learned while producing this work apply to a potential career?
  • How have I prepared myself within the fields that interest me? What further steps can I take before graduation?

Stay on track: Senior Seminar and portfolio completion are both required for graduating seniors. To further develop your professional writing, consider any of the rhetorical writing courses on our English Works recommended courses handout. Also, try to pinpoint any areas that you wish you’d gained more experience in—there are several resources on campus that can provide you with relevant networking connections and professional insight.


Page modified 8/4/14