Health Matters Newsletter


Health Center
LoGrasso Hall
SUNY Fredonia
Fredonia, NY 14063
(716) 673-3131 or
(716) 673-3132
(716) 673-4722 (fax)

Dates to Remember for the Month of October

  • October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month
  • It's Time to Get Your Flu Shot

 

Flu Shots are Available

When: Beginning on October 10, 2011

Between the Hours of: 9am-12am and 2pm-4pm

Where:LoGrasso Hall Health Center

Cost: $10.00 Students and $20.00 Faculty/Staff

**Fred Debit Card Only**

It is that time of the year again.  As we close in on the beginning of another flu season, the LoGrasso Hall Health Center is making available flu shots to whomever wishes to receive them. By receiving the flu shot, you may prevent  lost time from your studies or work, as well as the discomfort of the illness and its possible complications.  The Flu shot contains dead viruses which stimulate your immune system to protect against the viruses included in this year's vaccine.  Because the viruses are dead, you cannot get the flu from receiving the vaccine. The most frequent side-effect is soreness at the injection site.  Occasionally, some people have experienced fever and/or fatigue for a twenty four hour period following the receipt of the vaccine.


 

Health Center Health Tip

Staying Healthy in College

Going to college and living on your own is a living and learning experience. It's probably the only time in your life that you will ever be living with a community of people with the similar interests, goals, and, not to mention, germs.  Infectious organisms exist around us each and every day.  With germs so common, and almost everywhere, you should check out these simple habits that you can do to protect yourself from getting sick.

  • Practice good hand hygiene by washing your hands with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing.  Bathrooms in our residence halls are equipped with adequate supply of soap and paper towels to promote frequent hand washing.  Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective. Extra hand sanitizers are being installed throughout campus and in the resident halls.  
  • Practice respiratory etiquette by covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.  If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow or shoulder, not into your hands.  Avoid toughing your eyes, nose or mouth; germs are spread this way.
  • Get vaccinated.  Immunizations can drastically reduce your chances of contracting many diseases.  An annual flu shot will protect you against the seasonal flu.
  • Stay at home if you have signs and symptoms of an infection.  If you are vomiting, have diarrhea or are running a fever, you should not go to work or attend school.
  • Establish regular cleaning schedules for frequent cleaning of surfaces and items that are more likely to have frequent hand contact such as desks, door knobs, keyboards, or counters with cleaning agents that are usually used in these areas.
  • Be smart about food preparation.  Clean counters and other kitchen surfaces before and after preparing meals.
  • Practice safe sex. Use condoms . Condoms can aid in protecting you from sexually transmitted disease.
  • Don't share personal items. Use your own toothbrush, comb and razor blade. Avoid sharing drinking glasses or dinning utensils.
  • Travel wisely. Don't travel when you are ill. Illness can spread quickly due to the close proximity of many people in a confined area such as an airplane, bus or train.

October 2011


What's going around this month....

Get your Flu shots

The Common Cold and Pharyngitis


The Common Cold

There are over 200 virus strains linked to the common cold.  A cold can spread quickly in close quarters such as classrooms and college dormitories.  Spread by droplets from the nose and mouth of an infected person, the average college student will experience cold like symptoms 2-4 times each year.

Signs and Symptoms (Symptoms are slow in onset, lasting 5 - 10 days)

- Runny nose

- Sneezing

- Nasal Congestion

- Clear to yellow nasal discharge

- Scratchy, sore throat

- Cough

- No or low fever

- Mild Fatigue

Treatment

- Eat well, (small frequent meals) with adequate fluid intake

- Get plenty of rest

- Cover your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, and wash your hands often with soap and water in order to prevent spreading germs to others.

- It is important to not share eating utensils, drinking glasses, water bottles or toothbrushes with others in order to prevent spreading germs to others.

- Lozenges or cough drops may soothe a sore or dry throat.

- Gargle with warm salt water to soothe a sore or dry throat.

- Take pain relievers for discomfort such as Tylenol or Ibuprofen.

- Use decongestants such as Sudafed or Mucinex D or a short term decongestant spray (no more then 72 hours)

- Try over the counter salt water (saline) nose drops or nasal sprays

- Don't smoke

- If symptoms continue to worsen, or no improvement is seen, you should be evaluated by a health care provider

 

Acute Pharyngitis (Sore throat)

Pharyngitis is the swelling and inflammation of the pharynx or throat.  Most sore throats are viral in nature.  If the soreness does not resolve after two days, then you should be evaluated by a medical provider.

Signs and Symptoms

- Sore throat

- Pain or difficulty when swallowing

- Difficulty breathing

- Fever

- Enlarged lymph nodes in your neck

Treatment           

- In most instances, a sore throat is caused by a virus, and does not necessarily require an antibiotic for treatment. If an antibiotic is prescribed, you should see some improvement in 4 days. You must complete the entire course of antibiotics in order to treat the infection adequately. DO NOT share antibiotics with other people or save them for later.

- Eat well, (small frequent meals) with adequate fluid intake

- Get plenty of rest

- Cover your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, and wash your hands often with soap and water in order to prevent spreading germs to others.

- It is important to not share eating utensils, drinking glasses, water bottles or toothbrushes with others in order to prevent spreading germs to others.

- Lozenges or cough drops may soothe a sore or dry throat.

- Gargle with warm salt water to soothe a sore or dry throat.

- Drink warm liquids (tea or broth) or cool liquids to sooth a sore or dry throat.

- Take pain relievers for discomfort such as Tylenol or Ibuprofen.

- Use decongestants such as Sudafed or Mucinex D or a short term decongestant spray (no more then 72 hours) to relieve nasal congestion and a runny nose

- Try over the counter salt water (saline) nose drops or nasal sprays

- Don't smoke

- If symptoms continue to worsen, or no improvement is seen, you should be evaluated by a health care provider

 

 

 

 


Page modified 8/4/14