FAQs Filming


iTunes U - Professional Development Center
Daniel A. Reed Library
State University of New York at Fredonia
Fredonia, NY 14063

In this section you will find answers to questions you may have about how to film and who to contact about filming at locations. 

What do I need to get
started filming?
 
Where do I find people
for my video?
 
Whose job is it to maintain
content release forms? 
What settings should my
camera have to get the best
possible video quality? 
What kind of microphone should
I use for optimal sound?
 
How far away from the subject
should I be? How close?  
How do I light a subject? How should I frame my subject?
Are there rules associated with
this? 

What do I need to get started filming?

First you should either have attended the workshop on how to use equipment or viewed it online. Then contact appropriate person to obtain the necessary equipment. Then contact Mike Barone, PR Office, for content release forms and what to do if subject is underage. Last, if filming at particular locations you must contact appropriate person for permission. For a list of locations and who to contact view Who To Contact Section.

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Where do I find people for my video? 

You may ask any person you want to be in your video. However, content release forms should be ready and signed by any person appearing in the video.

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Whose job is it to maintain content release forms?

This job is the responsibility of whoever is hosting the event. An example is if a department is hosting a speaker and taping their speech the department is responsible for maintaining the forms.

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What settings should my camera have to get the best possible video quality? 

The settings will vary by camera. When using the Flip Mino HD there are no settings to change that would affect the video quality.

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What kind of microphone should I be using for optimal sound? 

If you are only recording audio the Yeti is the best kind of microphone to use. If you are filming video an external microphone will give the best quality. The type of external microphone you will want to use depends upon what you are filming.

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How far away from the subject should I be? How close?

The distance varies based on what you are filming, where you are filming, and the equipment you are using. Generally anywhere between 3 ft and 10 ft is a good distance. Prior to recording you should check the audio to verify that you are getting clear audio.

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How do I light a subject? 

The way in which you light a subject varies upon what you are filming and where you are filming. How to light a subject will be covered in the workshop. Generally, if in a studio setting, you will want to use a three point lighting system. The first light should be the key light. This light is in front of the subject and is the main light on the subject. The second light is the fill light. The fill light is also in front of the subject; it is placed opposite of the key light. This light fills in any shadows on the subject. The third light is a backlight. The backlight is place behind the subject facing the subject not the background. This light separates the subject from the background.

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How should I frame my subject? Are there any rules associated with this?
 

There are three major rules, in regards to framing, which should be followed. The first being the Rule of Thirds. The screen is divided into thirds both horizontally and vertically. When framing the subject their eye line should fall on the upper third line (horizontally). The subject should also be slightly off center and fall on any of the vertical third lines. The best practice is to have a subject's eyes fall along one of the top intersections.  The picture below highlights the intersections. The lower third line should be where the horizon is.

Rule of Thirds Grid                              

The picture below shows framing of a subject using the rule of thirds.

Proper Rule of Thirds

 

Another rule to follow when framing a subject is headroom. Headroom is the distance between the top of the subject’s head and the edge of the frame. The picture below on the left shows proper head room. The picture on the right shows an incorrect amount of headroom.

 

Proper head roomImproper head room

 

The third rule to follow when framing is lead room. This is the distance between the direction the subject is facing and the edge of the frame. There should be more distance on the side the subject is going to and less room on the side where they are coming from. The picture below shows a correct amount of lead room. The ball is heading to the right so there is more room on the right side of the frame. An incorrect amount of lead room would be if there were more room on the left side of the frame and less on the right.

 

Lead room Back to Top


Page modified 11/26/14