Persons to Remember  


3-1-3 Program
Learning Center
Fourth Floor, Reed Library
Carnahan-Jackson Center
State University of New York at Fredonia
Fredonia, NY 14063
Ph: (716) 673-3550
High School Guidance Counselors

High School Guidance Counselors: Bob Wright (Brocton), Gary Mahalak (Fredonia) discuss the 3-1-3 program during the 2008 Information Meeting with parents and students.

High School Guidance Counselor:

Be sure to keep in touch with your high school guidance counselor regarding high school requirements, questions about Regent's exams, Advanced Placement (AP) courses and your high school grade point average (GPA).

3-1-3 Advisors:

Advisement for academic choices is the responsibility of both the high school and the college. 3-1-3 advisers meet with you in the Learning Center to help you select courses for the spring semester and are available for academic questions and problems throughout the year, as is the high school guidance counselor. The 3-1-3 advisers and guidance counselors remain in close contact through the academic year so 3-1-3 students receive the maximum support and guidance possible.

It is important for students to stay in close touch with counselors as a strategy for catching academic difficulties early. Many support services are available and the success rate for 3-1- 3 students is very high but, since 3-1-3 students need to pass both high school and college courses to earn their high school diploma, addressing problems early is important.

Members of the Learning Center Staff serve as your academic advisors on campus. Feel free to e-mail, call or stop by during office hours.

 

Professors:

Faculty will post their office hours on or near their door, so be sure to check. Usually, the hours are also posted on the syllabus. If you schedule an appointment, be sure to contact the professor if you cannot make it. Not only is it courteous, your actions (or in-actions) do leave an impression. Stop in with questions, concerns, insights and revelations.

Be sure to take advantage of your professor's office hours to:

  • seek clarification on an assignment
  • if you do not understand a concept or teaching point in class
  • just to make yourself known (students who take the time to meet with their professors inevitability do better in their classes)

E-mail is a great way to contact your instructor, but be aware that while some instructors will check their e-mail several times a day, others may check only once a day and still others, only a couple times a week. Most professors will let you know if s/he prefers contact by e-mail or phone.

Since the Fredonia e-mail usernames only show a portion of a last name, it is extremely helpful to include your full name, the name of the class you are in and what time it meets somewhere in the e-mail. Your professor may have three sections of the same course, so taking the time to identify yourself will be appreciated.

Most faculty have some form of campus telephone voice mail. Check the current Campus Phone Directory to find a number. Often, the number is also on the syllabus. Two or three faculty members often have the same phone number, so be sure to state who the call is for, your name and the class you are in.


Page modified 11/26/14