Dr. Michael Dunham

  Dr. Michael Dunham, Ph.D.

Dr. Michael Dunham, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Houghton Hall 140 Houghton Hall

(716) 673-4930

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Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

http://www.facebook.com/fredobs

Dr. Michael M. Dunham is an assistant professor in the physics department at Fredonia. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in astronomy from the University of Texas at Austin, and a B.S. in physics and astronomy from the University of Rochester. Prior to joining the Fredonia faculty in 2016, he spent three years as a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Astronomy at Yale University, and three years as a Submillimeter Array Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. His research interests are in the physical processes responsible for the formation of stars and planets, and he has co-authored over 100 publications in peer-reviewed astronomy journals.

Teaching Interests

Dr. Dunham teaches a variety of courses within the physics major, as well as service courses for non-majors. He often focuses on teaching introductory level physics and astronomy courses, including PHYS 118: Introduction to Astronomy, a general education course dedicated toward using study of astronomy to learn what science is, how science works, and how to evaluate scientific information, and PHYS 121/122: College Physics, a sequence of introductory physics courses designed for science students not planning to pursue further studies in physics.

Research Interests

Dr. Dunham's research focuses on the physical processes responsible for the formation of stars and planets, and has resulted in over 100 co-authored publications in peer-reviewed astronomy journals.

Awards and Honors

  • William T. and Charlotte N. Hagan Young Scholar/Artist Award, State University of New York at Fredonia (2020).

Contracts, Grants and Sponsored Programs

  • "Quantitative Calibration of the Fredonia Observatory," N/A (2020).
  • "Extended Calibration of the Fredonia Observatory," N/A (2019).
  • "Calibration of the Fredonia Observatory for Scientific Observations," N/A (2018).