Finkeldey co-author of journal article on parental incarceration

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Dr. Jessica Finkeldey

Dr. Jessica Finkeldey

Criminal Justice Assistant Professor Jessica Finkeldey co-authored "Multilevel Effects of Parental Incarceration on Adult Children’s Neighborhood Disadvantage," an article published in the February issue of the journal Social Problems.

The article in the journal’s Volume 67, Issue 1, was jointly written with Christopher Dennison, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University at Buffalo.

In their study, the authors investigate the multilevel consequences of parental incarceration by examining the relationship between individual- and neighborhood-level rates of parental, maternal and paternal incarceration and adult neighborhood disadvantage.

The article is available online.

Dr. Finkeldey is a member of Society for the Study of Social Problems, American Society of Criminology and American Sociological Association.

Social Problems, the official publication of The Society for the Study of Social Problems, addresses a wide range of complex social concerns ranging from race and gender to labor relations, environmental issues and human rights.

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