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Professional Development Day Past Programs:

Professional Development Days

Fredonia is a community of learning in which faculty and staff recognize the importance of modeling lifelong learning for our students. As such, two days have been designated in each academic calendar, during which faculty and staff from all divisions are encouraged to participate in campus-wide professional development dialogues and activities.

 

Thursday, February 13, 2020. Classes will be held on this day. 
9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Light fare and refreshments provided 9:00 am - 12:00 pm! Please register for the individual sessions that you plan on attending. 

9:00 - 9:50 am 

Grants….Whaaat??!
Kathleen Gradel, Interim Director, Grants & Sponsored Programs
9:00 - 9:50 am, Williams Center S204A
Register to Attend
Grants...ready support or just another rabbit hole? Join us for a quick intro to our campus’ new and evolving grant supports. And find out about a special book study launching this spring; it will get you refreshed on grantwriting in a small supportive group of interested colleagues. This PD Day session is for seasoned and new grantseekers. One caveat: This session is a “teaser” for next steps, not a one-stop shop for your unique needs.
Suggested audience: Faculty and professionals

Classroom Apps for Social Good
Michael Jabot, Distinguished Professor, Education
9:00 - 9:50 am, Williams Center S204B
Register to Attend
This session will share an emerging pilot of integrating open-source social technologies into class work to inspire change and to help students see how and where their voices fit in the global conversation around on the UN Sustainability Goals. The hope is that this work will build a culture grounded in inquiry and discourse, to empower students to build on questions, seek out experts, and become confident individuals who are comfortable with imperfection and change.
Suggested audience: Teaching faculty and professionals with teaching responsibilities

Video in OnCourse for Personalization and Student Engagement
Lisa Melohusky, Online Learning Coordinator, Online Learning
9:00 - 9:50 am, Williams Center S204C

The use of video in a course can seem time consuming, and if you want to make something professional it is. In this workshop we will discuss the different options that OnCourse offers when it comes to including video in your course or asking students to submit video assignments.
Suggested audience: Teaching faculty and professionals with teaching responsibilities

5 Most Important Muscles to Stretch Daily
Sue Murphy, Coordinator, Employee Assistance Program
9:00 am - 9:50 am, Williams Center S204D
Register to Attend
Taking time to stretch each day is an important element in creating a healthy work life. Stretching is beneficial to the overall health of the body and plays a role in reducing musculoskeletal disorders. Session participants will learn some effective stretches that can be done in the office.
Suggested audience: Faculty, professionals and CSEA staff

10:00 - 10:50 am 

Teaching Controversial Issues in the College Classroom
Bob Dahlgren, Associate Professor, Education
10:00 - 10: 50 am, Williams Center S204A
Register to Attend
The issue of ideological bias in American higher education has garnered increased attention in recent years, with critics across the political spectrum challenging the right of college professors to discuss controversial public policy issues with their classes. This session will trace the history and conception of academic freedom in America's universities and present four common stances with regard to presenting controversial material and subjects. Participants will have a chance to discuss several recent case studies in small groups.
Suggested audience: Teaching faculty and professionals with teaching responsibilities

Using Google Sites to Create Electronic Dossiers for Tenure & Promotion
Dawn Eckenrode, Professional Development Center Director, PDC
10:00 - 10:50 am, Williams Center S204B
Register to Attend
Learn how to easily create a polished and professional looking electronic dossier for sharing tenure and promotion materials with your department personnel committee and reviewers. 
Suggested audience: Tenure-track faculty and librarians

Academic Department Secretaries Spring Semester Check-In
Scott Saunders, Registrar, Office of the Registar
10:00 - 10:50 am, Williams Center S204C
Register to Attend
This session is an invitation to all academic department secretaries to come share ideas, brag about your successes, pose questions about the various tasks we have to complete on a regular basis in the service of our students, faculty and staff.  Where are we with the new version of Banner? What's happening with the Catalog process? Intrigued? Come chat with your registrar!
Suggested audience: Academic Department secretaries

Creating an Interactive Syllabus
Susan Spangler, Associate Professor, English
10:00 - 10:50 am, Williams Center S204D
Register to Attend
How many times a semester do you say, "It's in the syllabus"? Ever wonder why students don't read your syllabus?  This session will show you several ways, ranging from low-tech to high-tech, to make your syllabus a readable, interactive document that students will enjoy reading and will actually understand.
Suggested audience:  Teaching faculty and professionals with teaching responsibilities

11:00 - 11:50 am

Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee - Who, What, When, Why, and How?
Presented by Members of the Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee
11:00 - 11:50 pm, Williams Center S204A
Register to Attend
The Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee (FPAC) is responsible for recommending policy on all matters on campus relating to the welfare of the faculty and professional staff except for those matters which contractually are the responsibility of the union representing the academic faculty and professional staff. The Committee also serves as an advisory board for the President of the University. Come to this session to meet the current members, learn about our current activities, and share your ideas to help direct our next year’s actions.
Suggested audience: Faculty and professional staff

Retention, race, and relevance
Brandon Williamson, Admissions Counselor, Admissions
11:00 - 11:50 am, Williams Center S204B
Register to Attend
This is a very highly interactive workshop that will yield the most obvious answers when it comes to the needs of your Minority populations. We will dive into some of the most well intended mistakes, and even those we aren't always aware of, while exploring things that isolate minority students in recruitment and on campus.
Suggested audience:  CSEA staff, professionals, and faculty who directly interact with students on campus

Study Abroad Course Proposals 101
Naomi Baldwin, Director, Office of International Education
11:00 - 12:00 pm
Williams Center S204C
Register to Attend
Have you been thinking of leading a study abroad program but aren't sure where to start?  Dr. Naomi Baldwin, Director of the Office of International Education, will take you through the course proposal process and offer a Q/A portion to discuss how study abroad intersects with other academic processes such as cross-listing, Fredonia Foundations, and applied learning attributes.
Suggested audience: Teaching faculty and professionals with teaching responsibilities

Working with Difficult People
Kathleen Gradel, Interim Director, Grants & Sponsored Programs
11:00 - 12:00 pm, Williams Center S204D
Register to Attend

We all know we - and everyone else in the workplace - can be viewed as “difficult” at one point or another. Dealing with people in the workplace isn’t easy, but there are some strategies that are worth having in your toolbox. We’ll take an upbeat approach to this challenging topic, and ask you for your great ideas as we do it. And - yes - there are prizes for great ideas!
Suggested audience: CSEA Staff

1:00 pm - 1:50 pm

Google Drive
Christopher Taverna, Applications Administrator/Applications Trainer, Information Technology Services
Thompson W207, 1:00 -  1:50 pm 
Register to Attend
This training session will cover using the following components of Google Drive:

My Drive

Shared Drives

Priority

Google Docs

Google Sheets

Google Slides

Sharing

In addition there will be a question and answer period at the end of the session.
Suggested audience: CSEA staff, faculty and professionals

Professional Development Day: CSEA & UUP Benefits Fair

 As part of the Professional Development Day on Thursday, February 13, 2020 CSEA and UUP will be hosting a Benefits Fair. Location: Williams Center, Multi-purpose Room. Light fare and refreshments will be served. 

All are encouraged to attend. As of today, we have the following tables:

CSEA - 9am until 12:00pm

CSEA Health Benefits Department

CSEA Members Benefits Department

New York's 529 College Savings Program

Pearl Insurance

CSEA Labor Relations Specialist

Local 607 Representatives (we will be having a raffle)

NYPIRG Fuel Buyers Group

NYS EAP

UUP - 9am until 12:00pm

UUP Benefit Trust Fund

Fredonia Organizer distributing UUP Membership Cards

Delta Dental

Davis Vision

Sprint

Voya

Liberty Mutual 

Aflac

The SUNY Fredonia Federal Credit Union will also be available to answer questions! 

 

 

Thursday, February 14, 2019. Classes will be held on this day. 
9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Light fare and refreshments provided throughout the day! Please register for the individual sessions that you plan on attending. 

Featured Sessions: 

Creating and Sustaining Inclusive Classrooms with Dr. Kevin Gannon
Williams Center, S204 A&B
9:00 - 10:50 am 
Recommended for faculty
Register to attend

This session will focus on classroom practices which promote an inclusive class climate. We cannot control much of the context from which our students come to us, but we do have the power to shape our class climate. Moreover, we can leverage that climate in service of equitable learning for all of our students. With that in mind, we’ll look at three types of classroom practices--discussions, group work, and assessments--through the lens of Inclusive Pedagogy. This interactive workshop will introduce evidence-based inclusive teaching practices, and help participants consider the ways in which they might incorporate them into their own courses. 

Toward an Inclusive Campus Community with Dr. Kevin Gannon
Williams Center, S204 A&B
1:00 - 2:50 pm 
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

We know that much of what students learn in their collegiate experience comes outside the formal classroom--and this is true for every office or unit on our campuses. But what are our students learning that we don’t intend to teach them? This session will use the concept of “the hidden curriculum” to help us think about what our students are hearing us say to them (in the broadest sense of that term).  We’ll consider the essential features of an inclusive campus community, in particular, the ways in which we all communicate with our students.

About our Speaker: 

Kevin Gannon, Ph.D. serves as Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) and Professor of History at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa, where he has taught since 2004. He was previously the program coordinator for the New Student Seminar and the History Department Chair. His teaching, research, and public work (including writing) centers on critical and inclusive pedagogy; race, history, and justice; and technology and teaching. He writes for Vitae (a section of The Chronicle of Higher Education), and his essays on higher education have also been published in Vox and other media outlets. He is currently writing a book called Radical Hope: A Teaching Manifesto, which will be published by West Virginia University press as part of their Teaching and Learning in Higher Education series, edited by James M. Lang. He is also working on a textbook for the US Civil War and Reconstruction eras for Routledge. In 2016, he appeared in the Oscar-nominated documentary 13th, which was directed by Ava DuVernay. 

Breakout Sessions: 

9:00 - 9:50 am 

CANCELLED: Cultural Diversity in the Classroom
Presented by Dr. Toluwani Oloke, Communication
Recommended for  faculty (Program track: Developing Cultural Competence) 
Williams Center, S204E

The session will provide tips for teachers/professors, to help them improve course design and instruction to recognize and promote cultural diversity in the classroom. Participants will: 

Be able to understand how to identify or recognize students who are struggling with feelings of exclusion in the classroom

Get ideas on specific activities to create and inclusive classroom environment and get students to be more participatory

Understand how cultural orientations of students influences their learning styles and how to factor this into their teaching for improved effectiveness

9:00 - 10:30 am

Healthier Lifestyle: The New Rules of Work 
Online course with discussion facilitated by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center
Thompson, W207
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

Learn why the modern workplace is changing so you can prepare yourself and learn new skills. Discover how to think differently about your chosen career path, learning, and life outside of work.

9:00 - 11:30 am

Microsoft PowerPoint Basics 
Presented by Dr. Kathleen Gradel, School of Education
McEwen, G22
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

This course provides the basic knowledge and skills needed to create a presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint 2013. Participants will be expected to have a working knowledge of desktop computers and be familiar with using the keyboard and mouse. And it's gonna be fun!!

10:00 - 10:30 am

EvaluationKIT- A Course Evaluation Software: Presentation
Presented by Rajeev Indiranagaraju, Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Assessment
Williams Center, S204E
Recommended for faculty
Register to attend

This session would like to present the new course evaluation software that was adopted by Fredonia since Fall 2018. Faculty are invited to become familiar with the software and also clarify any questions and concerns. It is suggested that you bring your own laptop, tablet, or smartphone to this hands-on session. 

10:30 - 11:00 am 

Student Survey Report: Student Opinion Survey
Presented by Rajeev Indiranagaraju and Xiao Zhang, Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Assessment
Williams Center, S204E
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

The Student Opinion Survey gathered information regarding student experiences on campus, including campus climate, academic experience and student services. This session will provide a summary of the survey report, along with time for Q&A. 

Dealing with Stress: Identifying Your Triggers
Online course with discussion facilitated by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center
Thompson, W207
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

A little stress can be motivational, a lot of stress can damage your health and/or relationships. Identify your triggers.

11:00 - 11:50 am

Starfish Early Alert - Beyond the Basics
Presented by Nicole Hohenstein and Amy Leclair, Academic Advising Service
Williams Center, S204C
Recommended for  faculty (Program track: Inclusive Practices to Increase Retention) 
Register to attend

Starfish Early Alert is designed to help faculty communicate academic progress concerns with the students in their classes, identify resources that might be helpful to their success, and provide them positive feedback on improved progress. Now that we are in the second year of implementation we'd like to share with you some other features of the tool, beyond raising flags through Progress Surveys. Academic advisors can view messages in order to provide additional support to students throughout the semester (and specifically during Academic Advising and Course Selection) in an effort to better understand student course performance and enhance advisee relationships.

CANCELLED: Multicultural Issues
Presented by Dr. McLoddy Kadyamusuma, Communication Disorders & Sciences
Williams Center, S204 E
Recommended for staff and faculty (Program track: Developing Cultural Competency) 
Register to attend

The session addresses different components of culture and ways in which cultures differ. We will seek to develop a detailed understanding of one's own culture and the characteristics of the major cultural groups in the United States. The session will aid in the development of strong intercultural communication techniques and skills for working in a culturally diverse workplace.

Dealing with Stress: Managing Stress for Positive Change
Online course with discussion facilitated by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center
Thompson, W207
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

In the workplace, stress is often viewed in purely negative terms. It's seen as a response that should be simply minimized or pushed aside; it's possible to use stress to fuel positive change.

11:00 am - 12:50 pm

Star Power
Presented by Kevin Hahn, Associate Director of Residence Life
Williams Center, S204A
Recommended for staff and faculty (Program track: Developing Cultural Competency) 
Register to attend

Star Power is a game designed by R. Garry Shirts. Participants will engage in a simulation of how power is defined and distributed in society. While the game itself promises to be fun and interactive, it will be followed by a serious discussion about power and privilege and how they both affect our work with students. 

12:00 pm - 12:50 pm

Fostering Equitable and Inclusive Student Success: Middle States Accreditation Self-Study Preliminary Findings
Presented by Dr. Mary Beth Sievens, History (Middle States Chair) and Dr. Lisa Hunter, Associate Provost 
Williams Center, S204C
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee - Who, What, When, Why, and How?
Presented by Members of the Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee
Williams Center, S204E
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

The Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee (FPAC) is responsible for recommending policy on all matters on campus relating to the welfare of the faculty and professional staff except for those matters which contractually are the responsibility of the union representing the academic faculty and professional staff. The Committee also serves as an advisory board for the President of the University. Come to this session to meet the current members, learn about our current activities, and share your ideas to help direct our next year’s actions.

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Understanding Today's Computer
Online course with discussion facilitated by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center
Thompson, W207
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

This course helps employees gain knowledge about common computing devices and their overall impact on today's workforce and society. It will cover the practical uses of popular trends in computers and related technologies.

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Effective Problem Solving: Problem Solving Techniques
Online course with discussion facilitated by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center
Thompson, W207
Recommended for staff and faculty
Register to attend

In this course, learn techniques for identifying the root cause of a problem, generating options, and selecting the best solution. Chris Croft takes you through several methods for identifying whats actually causing a problem, including loo kin at the whole system when a problem is actually a symptom of a larger issue.

The following day-long offerings are open to CSEA represented employees only: 

New York State and the labor union, CSEA have partnered to offer educational training to their membership. So, these sessions are open only to CSEA-represented employees. There are still seats available.

Carpentry Basics (9:00am-4:30pm, Williams Center, S202) Register to attend
This course introduces participants to the basic fundamentals of carpentry, including how to use hand and portable power tools, types of wood and their uses, painting and finishing, and basic construction techniques.

Plumbing Basics (9:00am-4:30pm, Williams Center, G103B) Register to attend
This course introduces the fundamentals of plumbing and pipefitting practices and describes how basic plumbing systems function.

 

Spring Semester Faculty & Staff Professional Development Day Events:

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
8:00 am - 3:00 pm

Register for the individual sessions you would like to attend below.

Feel free to attend all or part of the day. Activities and presentations will enable participants to connect with one another while exploring different ways of thinking about teaching, learning, and working. Lunch will be provided and requires registration.

The schedule in brief:

  • 8:00 - 9:00 am: Informal Networking & Morning Refreshments (Williams Center Multipurpose Room)
  • 9:00 am – 10:00 am: Keynote Address with Dr. Tia McNair
  • 10:00 am - 12:00 pm: Breakout Sessions for Faculty & Staff and “Helpful Hallway” Drop-In Support
  • 12:00 - 1:00 pm: Lunch & Faculty Panel Discussion
  • 1:00 – 4:00 pm: Breakout Sessions and Health & Wellness
  • 3:00 - 4:00 pm: Department Meetings (Watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads.)

Click Here for the Student Schedule 

8:00 am - 9:00 am: Networking & Refreshments

Coffee, tea, and assorted refreshments will be provided . Feel free to drop in for a cup of coffee and conversation with colleagues from across campus.


9:00 am - 10:00 am: Conversations About the Future of College

Keynote Address with Dr. Tia McNair:
Becoming a Student-Ready College: Our Collective Responsibility

Williams Center Multipurpose Room
Register Here

Imagine if the national conversation on college readiness and student success engaged in a reframing of the question "Are students college-ready?" to “Are our postsecondary institutions student-ready?” Dr. Tia McNair provides a new perspective on designing and leading student success efforts by asking the more pragmatic question of what are colleges and universities doing to prepare for the students who are entering our institutions? What changes need to be made in an institution's policies, practices, and culture to become student-ready and to make excellence inclusive for ALL students?

About our Speaker:

Dr. Tia McNair is the Vice President in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success at Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) in Washington, DC. McNair also directs AAC&U's Summer Institute on High-Impact Educational Practices and Student Success


Special Sessions:

Developing Individual and/or Team Action Plans for Becoming a Student-Ready Institution with Dr. Tia McNair
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Williams Center, S204 A 
Register Here


CANCELLED: Introduction to LehrerDance technique
9:00 am - 10: 20 am
Dance Studio, Rockefeller Arts Center
No registration required.


SafeZone Training
10:10 am - 12:00 pm
Williams Center, S204D
Presented by Khristian King, Intercultural Center Director
Register Here

The goal of SafeZone training is to provide a welcoming environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender persons by establishing an identifiable network of supportive persons who can provide support, information and a safe place for LGBTQ+ persons within our campus community. Those who have committed to being safe spaces indicate that bigotry and discrimination, specifically regarding LGBTQ+ persons, are not tolerated. 


By participating in our SafeZone training you will receive the Safe Space symbol. Displaying the symbol is a message that you are an understanding, supportive and trustworthy person if a LGBTQ+ person needs help, advice or just someone with whom they can talk.


"The Helpful Hallway"

10:10 am - 12:00 pm
Hallway outside Williams Center S204 rooms

Free blood pressure checks will be available compliments of the Health Center!

The following service areas will be available to answer questions on a drop in basis:

  • Online Learning

School of Music Visioning Session
10:10 am - 12:00 pm
Williams Center, S204B
Presented by Dr. Sue McNamara and Dr. Lisa Walters, School of Business
Register Here


Interactive Webinars presented by CSEA: 

Open to CSEA represented employees

Managing Finances 
9:00 am - 10:00 am

Register Here

Dealing with Stress

11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Register Here

Getting Organized

1:00 - 2:00 pm
Register Here 

Professionalism in the Digital Age

3:00 - 4:00 pm 
Register Here

Full Day Sessions for CSEA represented Employees:

Carpentry Basics
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Williams Center, G103C
(this session is full) 


10:10 – 11:00 am: Breakout Sessions

Plugging into Lynda.com
Presented by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center
Thompson Hall, W207
Register Here

Fredonia students, faculty, and staff can now access the complete library of 5000+ training videos (software, creative and business skills) from Lynda.com by logging in with your Fredonia eServices username and password at http://lynda.fredonia.edu

Take a "learning timeout" to develop the skills and knowledge needed for our professional development. Suggested playlists have been created with you in mind.

Please bring with you your mobile phone and/or another mobile device.

 

Internationalizing the Curriculum: Faculty opportunities panel
Presented by Bond Benton, Communication; Ann Deakin, Geology and Environmental Sciences; Ted Schwalbe, Communication; Tracy Stenger, Counseling Center; Ivani Vassoler, Politics and International Affairs
Williams Center, S204C
Register Here

This panel discussion will include faculty/staff who have recently participated in faculty/staff international professional development opportunities. We will discuss their experiences with the program and how they've applied the experiences to their work with students at Fredonia. Programs represented will include the China Studies Institute, Japan Studies Institute, Erasmus+, COIL, and Fulbright opportunities.

 

Creating an OnCourse-integrated class website using Google sites
Presented by Dr. Amanda Lohiser, Communication
McEwen Hall, Sheldon Lab
Register Here

This session will demonstrate the usefulness of Google Sites (and correlated features such as Google Drive and Google Forms) to create a permanent, personalized class website that can be integrated with the OnCourse platform. One of the main benefits of creating a class website using Google Sites is the fact that the site can be stored, edited and re-used from semester to semester or year to year. Other benefits include a user-friendly platform and the potential for student interactivity. Google Forms will be briefly highlighted as a platform for mid-semester feedback, student queries and discussion responses.

 

How to use Starfish during Academic Advising
Presented by Nicole Hohenstein and Amy Leclair, Academic Advising Services
Williams Center, S204E
Register Here

Starfish Early Alert is designed to facilitate communication between instructors and students. Academic advisors may be able to view these messages and provide additional support to students throughout the semester (and specifically during advising week) in an effort to better understand student course performance and enhance advisee relationships.

 


11:10 - 12:00 pm: Breakout Sessions

Student Success Data Roundtable Discussion: 2017 NSSE Results
Presented by Office of IRPA and Members of Retention Council
Williams Center, S204E
Register Here

"The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) surveys first-year and senior students to assess the extent to which they engage in and are exposed to proven educational practices that correspond to desirable learning outcomes" (NSSE 2009). Fredonia regularly participates in the NSSE survey. Facilitators will provide an overview of the 2017 survey results. Participants will discuss best practices for using these data to inform student success and retention efforts at the department and unit level. Session material will be of interest to faculty, staff, and administrators.

 

Writing Excellent Letters of Recommendation
Presented by Dr. Ted Lee, Biology
Williams Center, S204C
Register Here

The session will discuss key points for writing effective letters of recommendations for students. A focus will be on what information graduate schools, professional schools or employers would like to see in a letter of recommendation. As chair of the of the Health Professions Advising Committee, I read and write a lot of these letters and will share my experiences.

 

Grant Writing Basics
Presented by Dr. Paul Benson, Office of Sponsored Programs
Williams Center, Leadership Room
Register Here

This is a session for anyone interested the basics of finding funding for their research or community development projects. Basics covered are finding funding, reading Requests for Proposals (RFPs), budget basics, and a solid summary of getting the funding you seek. Benson has been in the grant business for over 25 years, the last five here at Fredonia.


Lunch from 12:00 - 1:00 pm:

Register Here

Soup, Salad (with chicken or hummus), dinner rolls and drinks will be available to registered faculty & staff in the Williams Center Multipurpose Room. Join us for informal networking and to catch up with colleagues.

Lunch Activity: 

Please join us as we continue toward our launch of Fredonia Foundations in Fall 2018.  During our working lunch, we invite faculty to review and refine our collective assessment rubrics.  Members of the staff who attend will have facilitated conversations about the new program and the ways it will affect their offices.  We look forward to continuing this work with you.


1:00 –1:50 pm: Breakout Session

CANCELLED: Ballroom Dance-- Latin Dance Styles
Taught by Jon Lehrer and company
Dance Studio, Rockefeller Arts Center
No registration required.

1:10 –2:00 pm: Breakout Sessions

Sense of belonging for students of color at Fredonia: We can do better
Presented by Dr. Bill Boerner, Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, and Jacquelynn Akins, Graduate Assistant- Residence Life
Williams Center, S204D
Register Here

Despite growth in racial and ethnically diverse students, feedback indicates feelings of unwelcome, isolation, and experiences of racial oppression from students of color at Fredonia. The University has a responsibility to continue to shift the culture of inclusion to support our students. Participants will gain an understanding of the lived experience for students of color at a predominantly white institution with the intention of gaining insights into how the classroom and co-curricular experience can better support a positive experience.
 

Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee - Who, What, When, Why, and How?
Presented by Members of the Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee
Williams Center, S204E
Register Here

The Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee (FPAC) is responsible for recommending policy on all matters on campus relating to the welfare of the faculty and professional staff except for those matters which contractually are the responsibility of the union representing the academic faculty and professional staff. The Committee also serves as an advisory board for the President of the University. Come to this session to meet the current members, learn about our current activities, and share your ideas to help direct our next year’s actions.

OER: Fact or Fiction?
Presented by Dawn Eckenrode, Professional Development Center; Sophie Forrester and Kerrie Wilkes, Reed Libary; and Lisa Melohusky, Online Learning
Williams Center, S204C
Register Here

Can I still participate in the Fredonia OER incentive?  Where do I find good OER content?  Is this content considered OER?  What about copyright?  Find out answers to these questions and bring your own to our discussion about OER's at Fredonia, their creation and use.

Academic Department Secretaries Spring Semester Check-In
Presented by Scott Saunders, Registrar
Williams Center, S204A
Register Here

This session is an invitation to all academic department secretaries to come share ideas, brag about your successes, pose questions about the various tasks we have to complete on a regular basis in the service of our students, faculty and staff.  Where are we with ARGOS?  What's happening with Banner this summer?  Maintaining advisors concerns.  Intrigued?  Come chat with your registrar!

Drupal Basics Training 
Presented by Jonathan Woolson, Marketing & Communication
Thompson W207
Register Here

Drupal training is required for new users to edit your department's web pages.

Topics covered in Drupal Basics:

  • Creating, Editing and Publish a Webpage
  • Using My Workbench in Drupal
  • Adding a Link
  • Adding an Image
  • Inserting a Page Image/Carousel
  • Inserting a Youtube Video
  • Linking to a PDF
  • Editing a Navigation Menu
  • Uploading and Renaming Web Files and Images
  • Editing a Background image
  • Editing your Office block

2:10 - 3:00: Health & Wellness

The Basics of Good Nutrition
Presented by Brooke Briscoe, FSA
Williams Center, S204A
Register Here

Information will be provided on how to make healthier choices every day at home, and on campus. Tips and tricks for portion control will be provided. Partcipants will leave this interactive session with the following:

1. An understanding of serving sizes of food groups  2. Strategies for mastering portion control  3. Knowing how to choose the best of the worst food options when dining out

The Basics of Exercise
Presented by Jon-Ryan Maloney, Strength and Conditioning Coach
Williams Center, S204D
Register Here

An introduction to fundamental exercises that can be done in a gym, at work, or at home. Topics will include injury prevention, bodyweight strength training, aerobic exercise, and workplace health.

2:00 - 3:30: Breakout Session

Web Accessibility Training for Drupal Web Publishers
Presented by Jonathan Woolson, Marketing & Communication
Thompson W207
Register Here

Web accessibility is a term used to describe a set of standard, consistent web publishing practices that we must follow so that all users — who may be vision-impaired, hearing-impaired, deaf, blind, color-blind, and have other impairments — can access ALL of the information we publish on the University’s public website.

The first 45 minutes is a training presentation, covering a detailed explanation of common web accessibility issues. There will be an optional, 45-minute, open "clinic-style" session, following the training. During this optional clinic time, users can apply the methods from the training to their own sites and ask for help solving accessibility issues.


3:00 - 4:00 pm: Department Meetings

Watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads.


CANCELLED: 4:00 - 5:30 pm

Informal Showing of the LehrerDance company followed by a Q&A with the artists (open to the entire campus)
Dance Studio, Rockefeller Arts Center
No registration required.

Repertory: “The Way Within,” “Bridge & Tunnel,” “Rhapsody,” “Here in This Eden,” and “Troika”

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This section is under construction.

Spring Semester Faculty & Staff Professional Development Day Events:

Learning and the Mind: The Power of Creativity

Friday, February 10, 2017

The schedule in brief:

  • 8:00 - 9:00 am: Informal Networking & Morning Refreshments
  • 9:00 - 12:00 pm: Breakout Sessions for Faculty & Staff
  • 12:00 - 1:00 pm: Lunch and Table Topics
  • 1:00 - 2:00 pm: Joint Session for Faculty & Students
  • 2:00 - 3:00 pm: Health & Wellness
  • 3:00 - 4:00 pm: Department Meetings (Watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads.)

A wide variety of activities are available to students as well. Please encourage your students to attend! Student Schedule Coming Soon!

About our guest speakers:

Author of “Beyond Talent: Creating a Successful Career in Music,” Angela Myles Beeching is dedicated to helping musicians live the life they desire. Her experience includes directing the Center for Music Entrepreneurship at Manhattan School of Music as well as directing career programs at New England Conservatory and Indiana University. She maintains a thriving consulting practice, working with individuals, ensembles, and institutions to facilitate change.

Elise Newkirk-Kotfila is the Director of Applied Learning at the State University of New York. Elise joined the State University of New York shortly after receiving her Master of the Arts degree from the University at Albany where she studied Women’s Studies and Public Policy with a research concentration on community-university partnerships. Her current work responsibilities include directing the SUNY Applied Learning Initiative as well as SUNY and the Vibrant Community, one of the 6 Big Ideas put forth in The Power of SUNY: Strategic Plan 2010 & Beyond. Elise is interested in the best practices associated with coalition building and community engagement, especially the formation of reciprocal and sustainable partnerships. She has presented on Applied Learning to state, national, and international audiences.

8:00 am - 12:00 pm:

Coffee, tea, and assorted refreshments will be provided in the Williams Center Multipurpose Room. Feel free to drop in for a cup of coffee and conversation with colleagues from across campus.


Q&A with the Fredonia Foundations Team

Members of The Fredonia Foundations Team will be on hand (9:00 am - 12:00 pm) to provide information about Fredonia's new general education program. Stop by the Multipurpose Room to say hello and have your questions answered. Click here for more info regarding Fredonia Foundations.

9:00 - 9:50 am:

SUNY Applied Learning
Elise Newkirk-Kotfila, Director of Applied Learning, SUNY System Administration
Williams Center, G103B

Real-world, hands-on learning is the hallmark of a SUNY education. These applied and experiential education opportunities prepare students to be life-long learners who are engaged in their communities and more likely to stay and work in New York State. Come learn about the role that Fredonia plays in the SUNY Applied Learning Initiative, the largest initiative of its kind in the world. Elise Newkirk-Kotfila will present on relevant studies, student experiences, and describe the work of New York State Institutions as each SUNY campus decides whether to make applied learning a graduation requirement for all students. This will include examples of the types of Applied Learning campuses are offering as well as some challenges that have been identified.


The Empowerment Triangle: Focus, Grit, and Growth Mindset
presented by Paula Peters, Theatre & Dance
Williams Center, G103C

Fostering student empowerment in higher education leads to creative, open-minded, and inquisitive citizens. In order to facilitate student empowerment, educators need to structure methods of instruction and assessment which help students to develop self-efficacy in school, and beyond. This session will focus on instruction and assessment methods which utilize strategies developed from the books "Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence;" "Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance;" and "Mindset: The New Psychology of Success." The aims of these methods is to give students the mindset to self-assess and improve, rather than looking to external sources (professors, coaches, employers) for validation and direction.


Creating a Class Website using Google Sites
presented by Amanda Lohiser, Communication
McEwen Hall, Sheldon Lab

This session will demonstrate the usefulness of Google Sites (and correlated features such as Google Drive and Google Forms) to create a permanent, personalized class website that can be integrated with the OnCourse platform. One of the main benefits of creating a class website using Google Sites is the fact that the site can be stored, edited and re-used from semester to semester or year to year. Other benefits include a user-friendly platform and the potential for student interactivity. Google Forms will be briefly highlighted as a platform for mid-semester feedback, student queries and discussion responses.


Cultural Competence through Conversation
presented by Khristian King, Intercultural Center
Williams Center, S204D

None of us are defined by a single identity. We owe who we are to multiple identities -- our race, our ethnicity, our gender, our sexual orientation, our religious beliefs, our socioeconomic status, our age, the degree to which we are able-bodied, and countless others. In this session, we will learn about how our identities intersect as well as practice starting and sustaining conversations with students about identity and diversity.


Unlocking Creativity: Turning the key to a creative campus climate
presented by Brandon Williamson, Creativity Consultant, Admissions
Williams Center, S204E

“It is the beginning of wisdom to call things by their proper name." This saying, made famous by Confucius stands true when it comes to many aspects of the world. Knowing and understanding what you're dealing with would often give the ability to call it by its proper name. When working and dealing with children, you understand everything that makes up a child from appearance, to behavior, to core development. So what can we say about a creative atmosphere? If we were to encounter creative people, what characteristics, what behaviors, what core ingredients make up the creative mind? What patterns of creativity are prevalent throughout history? And how did we get to these days where creativity is something often desired but seldom understood. In this session, we will discuss the habits that inhibit creativity and how to break them in order to build a creative campus climate.


The Rise of the "Fake News" Phenomenon
panel discussion with Scott S. Richmond (moderator), Reed Library; Lara Herzellah, Reed Library; Mike Igoe, Communication; Elmer Ploetz, Communication; and John Staples, History
Williams Center, S204C

Join us for a panel discussion on the cultural shifts that gave rise to the fake news phenomenon.


Grant Writing Basics
presented by Paul Benson, Office of Sponsored Programs
Williams Center, G103A

Grant Writing Basics will cover grant fundamentals: finding grants, determining eligibility, talking to agency officials (big plus), application components, budgets (easier than you might think) and applying through OSP. The Office of Sponsored Programs offer services that range from grant development to award closeout. Attendees will walk away with a better understanding of the grant process and resources available to them.


Introduction to LehrerDance technique
taught by Jon Lehrer & company
Merrins Dance Theatre, Rockefeller Arts Center

Open to all! Session runs from 9:00 - 10:20.


10:00 - 10:50 am:

Featured Breakout:

The 5 Clues to Boosting Creativity in Teaching & Learning
with guest speaker Angela Beeching
Williams Center, S204A&B

In this interactive session, we'll examine the obstacles that hinder creativity in the classroom. We'll try out practical tools for increasing imaginative and inventive teaching and learning.


Q&A Session: SUNY Applied Learning
Elise Newkirk-Kotfila, Director of Applied Learning, SUNY System Administration
Williams Center, G103B

Real-world, hands-on learning is the hallmark of a SUNY education. These applied and experiential education opportunities prepare students to be life-long learners who are engaged in their communities and more likely to stay and work in New York State. This session will offer the opportunity to ask questions and gain insight regarding SUNY applied learning initiatives. Join Elise for this informal Q&A and brainstorming session.


Teaching Democracy
facilitated by Terry Brown, Provost
Williams Center S204C

What can we do in our classrooms and outside our classrooms to engage students in the pressing issues of today? How do we provide the necessary historical, political, social, and cultural context to help them understand the changes we are experiencing in our country? What is our responsibility as a public university to provide a forum for informed discussion and debate about these contentious issues that have gone from theory to policy over the last ten days? What basic, essential knowledge about our government and political system do we need in order to make sense of the news? Faculty and staff are invited to join Provost Brown in a discussion of these issues.


A Brief Primer on COACHE and the COACHE Survey
presented by Judy Horowitz, Associate Provost; Rajeev Indiranagaraju, Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment; and Brian Masciadrelli, Sociocultural & Justice Sciences
Williams Center, S222

In February, Fredonia's full-time pre-tenure, tenured and full-time contingent faculty will have the opportunity to participate in a survey of job satisfaction. This session will provide information about the survey and will provide faculty with deeper understanding of how the results can be used to strengthen the institution and make Fredonia an even better place to work.


Release Your Visual Voice with Adobe Editing
presented by Roslin Smith, Communication
McEwen Hall, Sheldon Lab (1st floor)
This two hour session runs from 10:00 - 12:00 pm

Make yourself proud, have fun and discover your creativity by creating a 30 second poetic documentary. During this crash course in video editing, Faculty and staff will choose images, cut them together and add music. If there is time simple titles and end credits will also be added. The finished film can be shown at your department meetings, friends and family gatherings.


The Juggling Act of Academic Advising
presented by Amy Leclair, Academic Advising, and Andrea Zevenbergen, Psychology
Williams Center, S204D

This roundtable discussion will focus on effective advising strategies and tips. Please come share your ideas with us and learn about the recent initiatives of the Academic Advising Council. All participants will receive a variety of helpful resources to help you juggle academic advising with other professional responsibilities.


Reed Library: Your First Line of Defense Against Fake News
presented by Kerrie Fergen Wilkes, Associate Director for Research, Outreach and Assessment; Scott S. Richmond, Coordinator of Instructional Initiatives; Lara Herzellah, Research and Information Literacy Librarian; and Sophie M. Forrester, Digital Services Librarian
Williams Center, G103C

Join us for an interactive discussion about how information literacy instruction services can help your students learn the skills they need to evaluate sources and identify fake news.


7 Habits of Highly Effective Instructors
presented by Susan Spangler, English
Williams Center, S204E

No matter what level, no matter what subject, no matter culture, implementing these 7 factors will improve teaching and learning in your courses.


11:00 am - 11:50 am:

Featured Breakout:

Teaching Entrepreneurship: Art of the Startup
with guest speaker Angela Beeching
Williams Center, S204A&B

No matter what the discipline, entrepreneurial thinking can enhance student motivation and leadership skills. Find simple and effective ways to help students take ownership of their own learning to boost morale in the classroom.


Face 2 Face in the Workplace
with guest speaker Jessica Hutchings
Williams Center, S204D

This is a proactive, educational program establishes a convenient and stigma proof way to educate college personnel about the trends and consequences of adolescent substance use and addiction. A proactive panel which includes an addiction counselor as well as a relatable parent and/or adolescent in recovery (when available) to deliver this strong message. Additionally, this program provides information about treatment resources available in the WNY community. "Our employees were educated, inspired, shocked, and ultimately, grateful for the interactive dialogue....We viewed this training opportunity as a benefit designed not just for the employee, but their family as well.” – Pat Greco, Managing Supervisor, Buffalo Coca-Cola.


Starfish Early Alert Tool
presented by Erin Mrozcka, First-Year and Transition Programs
Williams Center, S204C

Starting fall 2017 Fredonia will be using a new student success software to help us better intervene with students at risk of persistence. Starfish is mobile and user friendly early alert tool designed to help faculty, staff, and advisors: Identify students exhibiting academically risky behaviors (poor attendance, missing assignments, low test scores) Send students automated feedback encouraging them to take action or connect them to campus resources Create a communication loop with members of a student's a support team Come learn more about the tool and personalized training opportunities for your department.


A Few of our Favorite Things for Teaching Statistics
presented by Nancy Boynton and Amber Powell, Mathematical Sciences; Darrin Rogers and Dani McMay, Psychology; and Rebha Sabharwal, Sociocultural & Justice Sciences
Williams Center, S204E

There are many resources to help promote student understanding of statistics. These include applets, websites and activities. We will present a few of our favorites. (You may find a laptop helpful.)


Teaching with Your Mouth Shut: The Inquiry-Centered Teaching of Donald L. Finkel
Jonathan Cox, Mathematical Sciences
Williams Center, G103B

Donald L. Finkel wrote the book "Teaching with your mouth shut" to describe his personal approach to teaching developed over the course of his career, an approach which differs drastically from societal expectations of what teachers do. By engaging in an activity, contemplating deep questions, and summarizing some key ideas of the book, we will wrestle with the practicality and meaning of teaching by means other than telling. Although developed after and seemingly separate from the Moore Method (Inquiry-Based Learning - IBL) in mathematics, Finkel's work could be considered a theoretical foundation for its modern form. But I believe Finkel reveals possibilities that reach a scope far beyond how IBL is currently employed, both in subject and in pedagogy. Although content is secondary from his perspective, most of Finkel's examples are drawn from literature and philosophy.


Moving Beyond Awareness: Developing Cross-Cultural Skills
presented by Bill Boerner, Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
Williams Center, G103C

Many individuals are aware of cultural and other differences, yet they have not necessarily moved beyond celebratory recognition. This session will outline a model for developing cultural competence, including cross-cultural skills. Case studies will be utilized to support participant's development of skills sets towards an inclusive mindset. Attendees can apply these skills to engage as leaders, teachers, and peers in the work environment.


Data Practices - Managing Advisors in Banner
presented by Amy Leclair, Academic Advising, and Scott Saunders, Registrar
Williams Center, G103A

Fredonia would like to start managing advisor information in Banner in a meaningful way. This is a call out to all academic department secretaries to please join us for this training session. We will discuss the new advisor types that have been created and how we will all maintain advisor information in a consistent manner to help eliminate confusion and bad data.


Lunch with Table Topics from 12:00 - 12:50 pm:

Pizza, salad and drinks will be available to registered faculty & staff in the Williams Center Multipurpose Room. Please join us!

12:00 - 12:50

Audition Tips 101, lecture with Q & A
taught by Jon Lehrer & company
(Open to the entire campus!)
Merrins Dance Theatre, Rockefeller Arts Center


1:00 - 2:00 pm

The Entrepreneurial Mindset: You, Inc.
with guest speaker Angela Beeching
Williams Center, S204 AB&C

How do achievers deal with setting goals, overcoming challenges, and getting things done? We'll unpack the seven keys to eliminating self-sabotaging behavior as we explore the psychology of success.


Ballroom Dance
taught by Jon Lehrer & company
(Open to the entire campus!)
Merrins Dance Theatre, Rockefeller Arts Center


2:00 - 3:00: Health & Wellness

Work and Play
with guest speaker Jane Fischer, MA, CAS
Williams Center, G103B

Work and play are complements, not opposites! This interactive and FUN “playshop” will help you unlock creativity, improve communication, and encourage collaboration. What’s the business side? Empathy, teamwork, and morale boosting. What’s the play side? Laughter, imagination, and creation. Participants will engage in exercises that explore play as a way to reinvigorate, inspire, and reconnect individuals and teams.


Express Yourself - The Fredonia Diversity Quilt Project
presented by members of the Diversity Quilt Project Committee: Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center; Liza Smith, Learning Center; and Kathy Forester, Residence Life
Williams Center, S226

Come join us and tell your own story through art by creating a quilt block. The only skills needed are, trace a design and use crayons to color the design. Materials will be provided. Need design ideas to jump start your creativity, click here.


Zumba! The fun dance party with Paul Mockovak, Dods Dance Studio (class will begin at 2:10 and end at 2:45)

Enjoy a dance session that is all about having fun with Latin American dance flavor with the hidden added perk of getting a great workout. Come and see why Zumba is so popular. We have all levels- it's all about have a great time.


Yoga with Susan Murphy, Dods Hall Gymnasium (class will begin at 2:10 and end at 2:50)

An ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practiced for health and relaxation.


3:00 - 4:00 pm: Department Meetings

Watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads.


4:00 - 5:30 pm:

Informal Showing of the LehrerDance company, followed by a Q&A with the artists (open to the entire campus)

Merrins Dance Theatre, Rockefeller Arts Center

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2016 - 2017 Professional Development Days

Fredonia is a community of learning in which faculty and staff recognize the importance of modeling lifelong learning for our students. As such, two days have been designated in the 2016-2017 academic calendar, during which faculty and staff from all divisions are encouraged to participate in campus-wide professional development dialogues and activities.

Fall Semester Faculty & Staff Professional Development Day Events:

Learning and the Mind: The Power of Persistence

Learning & the Mind

 

   Tuesday, September 13, 2016
   8:30 am - 3:00 pm



Feel free to attend all or part of the day. Activities and presentations will enable participants to connect with one another while exploring different ways of thinking about teaching, learning and working. Lunch will be provided. 
 

The schedule in brief:

  • Networking and Morning Refreshments with Colleagues: 8:30 - 9:00 am
  • Featured Presentation: 9:00 - 10:15 am
    • Belonging and Growth Mindset presented byTerry Brown, Provost; Lisa Hunter, Associate Provost; and Erin Mroczka, Director of First Year and Transition Programs
  • Breakout sessions: 10:30 - 11:20 am, 11:30 - 12:20, and 1:00 - 1:50 pm
  • Pizza and Salad served in the Williams Center Multipurpose Room for registered participants: 12:20 - 1:00 pm
  • Health & Wellness events: 2:00 - 3:00 pm
  • Naloxone (Opiod overdose) Training Sessions: 10:00 - 11:30 am, 12:30 - 2:00 pm, 2:30 - 4:00 pm
  • Departmental Discussions: 3:00 - 4:00 pm (watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads)

Click here to select the sessions you would like to register for!

A wide variety of activities are available to students as well. Please encourage your students to attend! Student Schedule Available Here!


8:30 - 10:15 am 

Belonging and Growth Mindset
Presented by Terry Brown, Provost; Lisa Hunter, Associate Provost; and Erin Mroczka, Director of First Year and Transition Programs.
9:00 am - 10:15 am
Williams Center Multipurpose Room
(Morning refreshments served  at 8:30 am)

Best practices and strategies for building a campus culture where all students feel they belong and can succeed will be shared, along with practical examples of recent campus projects that adopt these principles to impact student achievement. An update on campus retention efforts, and information about the changing makeup of Fredonia's student body, will be provided by Provost Brown. This is a great opportunity to learn more about our students, while engaging in thoughtful discussion with colleagues from across campus.  


10:30 - 11:20 am:

A Differentiated Fredonia:  Recognizing the Diverse Needs of Today's Students
Williams Center, Room S204A
Presented by Dr. Terry Brown, Provost

Join Provost Brown in a discussion of the Lumina Foundation report, The Differentiated University: Recognizing the Diverse Needs of Today's Students.  She will lead a discussion of how understanding distinct student mindsets can help our students succeed.


We Belong: Fostering a Sense of Belonging at Fredonia
Williams Center, Room S204C
Panel Discussion with Dr. Nancy Boynton, Mathematical Sciences; Kevin Hahn, Associate Director Residence Life; Dr. Susan McNamara, Business; Erin Mroczka, Director of First Year and Transition Programs; and Dr. Mary Beth Sievens, History

It has been asked, “Why do students leave Fredonia?”  More often than not, the reasons are personal to each student and frequently center around concerns about not fitting in or connecting to our community. This workshop will provide an introduction to the research around “belonging” and its implications on student success.  Faculty and staff will share insight about how their department is intentionally trying to build personal connections and increase engagement among new students.

Using OnCourse Quizzes for Assessments
Williams Center, Room S204D
Presented by Lisa Melohusky, Coordinator of Online Learning

OnCourse offers several tools to facilitate different types of assessments online. In this workshop will will focus on the use of the Quiz tool. This tool replaces the assessment tool that was found in ANGEL and allows for a variety of question types. The workshop will look at the different types of questions types, building an assessment, importing questions, and managing completion and grading of the assessment.

Chosen Names and Beyond: Creating a Gender-Inclusive Campus
Williams Center, Room G103B
Presented by Dr. Jennifer Hildebrand, History; Dr. Jeff Iovannone, Interdisciplinary Studies; and Dean Bavisotto, student

Pronouns and names consistent with one’s gender provides an inclusive, supportive, safe and nondiscriminatory campus. Come learn and experience how to make this cultural shift.

Power of Language: Impact vs Intent
Williams Center, Room S204E
Presented by Dr. Bill Boerner, Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Many individuals do not intend to hurt others with their words, yet the impact is still felt.  This session will explore the power of language and how microaggressions, stereotypes, and discrimination can impact the workplace environment.

Building a Handbook for the Secretarial/Clerical Staff - Come Help Us!
Williams Center, Room G103C
Presented by Tracy Horth, Secretary 2 (Academic Affairs); Leah Betts, Office Assistant 3 (Finance & Administration); and Deborah Lanski, Secretary 2 (Student Affairs)

Let’s remove the mystique of the flow of information that’s shared amongst our colleagues. You are invited to help create a survival tool. Come help build a practical guide that helps us deal with the multitude of situations that come our way.


11:30 am - 12:20 pm:

We Can Learn: Structuring Courses,  Assignments and Feedback to Promote a Growth Mindset
Williams Center, Room S204A
Presented by Dr. Lisa Hunter, Associate Provost; Dr. Carmen Rivera, Associate Dean College of Liberal Arts & Sciences; and Dr. Kathleen Gradel, Education

Fostering a growth mindset in the college classroom goes well beyond challenging students’ beliefs about their academic strengths and weaknesses. The structure of a course, sequenced development of content specific skills, assessment and grading, feedback, and classroom environment are critical to supporting a growth mindset. This interactive session will explore concrete methods and examples of supporting a growth mindset in the college classroom. Faculty who have been incorporating such strategies in their classroom as well as faculty looking to expand their pedagogy are invited to attend to share their ideas and examples. This session will also be useful to faculty and staff working with students in co-curricular activities. All examples will be collected to begin development of Fredonia’s campus resource on fostering growth mindset in the classroom. Mindset is buzzword; let's make it real!

Breaking into Online Teaching: Is Teaching Online Right for Me?"
Williams Center, Room S204B
Presented by Dr. Dani Peterka-Benton, Sociocultural & Justice Sciences

Online teaching and learning have become integral parts of the higher education landscape, however many educators are still uncertain whether going online is the right path for them. This session will provide some information on the role of online education in institutions of higher learning and will also introduce the audience to some practices that will help the novice online instructor to succeed in this new teaching medium. Experienced online instructors are also welcome to discuss and share their own best practices, so we can all expand our ever growing knowledge base about online teaching and learning.

E-dossier: Preparing materials for reappointment and tenure review
Thompson Hall, Room W217
Presented by Dr. Jill Reese, School of Music

Tired of binders and tabs? Consider creating an electronic dossier (e-dossier) for the reappointment and tenure review process. We will explore ways you can create your own e-dossier using Google Sites. The website format provides opportunities for flexibility that are impossible using the traditional paper format. Following a step-by-step process, we will create a site, organize categorical "tabs," and load and connect supporting documents.  Prior to session, please load CV and electronic copies of some other documents you might include in your dossier to your Google Drive.

Creating effective peer review assignments with the OnCourse "Workshop" tool
Williams Center, Room S204C
Presented by Dr. Darrin Rogers and Dr. Joseph McFall, Psychology

The OnCourse/Moodle "Workshop" (WKSHP) tool is versatile and useful for creating effective peer-review assignments for a variety of class types and content. It scales well from twelve students through a hundred or more. A WKSHP assignment automates the most time-consuming and complex tasks in effective peer-review assignments, leaving teachers free to focus on content and student learning. Although the initial creation of a WKSHP assignment is comparable to a thorough traditional assignment, the level of involvement and feedback each student experiences is far greater, and the WKSHP can be reused in future semesters or shared with other instructors. This tool can be confusing without a proper introduction. In this presentation attendees will be introduced to WKSHP, explore the many setup options, and learn general best practices. The instructors will walk attendees through the creation of a WKSHP assignment, then guide those with mobile devices through a minimal WKSHP assignment from a student’s perspective. Please bring your own laptop or device to this session.

Academic Departments (Secretaries) and the Registrar
Williams Center, Room S204D
Presented by Scott Saunders and Kristin Dobmeier, Office of the Registrar

The Academic Departments and the Registrar's Office create a great support team for our students and faculty.  Let’s gather together to talk about some upcoming changes like the elimination of the registration PIN cards, registration overrides and the need for printed transcripts in advising folder.  We can converse about other ideas on how to strengthen our relationships and continuously improve our service to the campus community.

Stress Management - Balancing Caregiving: Helping Elderly Parents Age Successfully
Williams Center, Room S204E
Presented by Dr. MaryAnn Spanos, Director, Chautauqua County Office of the Aging

Many caregivers deal with the transitional challenges they experience when the responsibility for their elderly parents’ safety and comfort becomes one of their integral roles. Balancing work and caring for a loved one can be intensely overwhelming — both emotionally and financially. This session will equip you with the tools to make impactful decisions associated with caring for an elderly loved one.

Lynda.com: Computer Basics and Skills for Success
Thompson Hall, Room W207
Presented by Sandra Lewis, Professional Development Center

Lynda.com leading online learning platform that helps anyone learn business, software, technology and creative skills to achieve personal and professional goals. Through our academic subscription, you have access to the lynda.com video library of engaging, top-quality courses taught by recognized industry experts. This session will demonstrate online courses and videos that would help you improve basic computer skills and develop skills in your career.


Lunch from 12:20 - 1:00 pm:

Pizza, salad and drinks will be available to registered faculty & staff in the Williams Center Multipurpose Room. Please join us!


1:00 - 1:50 pm:

Sometimes We Need Help and It’s OK: Destigmatizing Needing and Asking for Help
Williams Center, Room S204D
Presented by Erin Mroczka, Director of First-Year and Lisa Newell, Director of Student Conduct

We all have ownership in student success, including the students themselves.  However, there are many times when a student is in need of assistance and won’t ask for help. This workshop will address the practical ways in which we all can better identify and support students who may be struggling with academics or personal transitions to college.  We will discuss the value of taking attendance early and often, describe how and when to submit a report through current early alert channels, and role play interactions with students who are perceived as being resistant to taking responsibility for their success.

Fostering Growth Mindset in Fredonia Foundations
Williams Center, Room S204A
Presented by Dr. Joe McFall, Psychology; Justin Conroy, Physics; and KimMarie Cole, English

This session will be a focused and interactive discussion on how to foster a growth mindset and present the value of the Fredonia Foundations Program to students in print, media, and advising sessions. The Fredonia Foundations infographic draft and other resources will be shared in detail.

Creating Accessible Course Content for Students with Print Disabilities
Williams Center, Room S204C
Presented by Adam Hino, Disability Services

This session will talk about Fredonia's responsibilities for ensuring that documents are accessible for users with print disabilities and introduce SensusAccess as a tool for meeting the needs of these students.

OnCourse Features and Strategies for Getting to Know Your Students
Williams Center, Room S204B
Presented by Lisa Melohusky, Coordinator of Online Learning; and Dr. Kathleen Gradel, College of Education

During today’s sessions, we are all thinking through ways to help students get a handle on their growth vs. fixed mindsets...identify what grit is and what it looks and feels like…and more. This puts faculty in an interesting position, doesn’t it? Student:faculty relationships do make a difference! But what happens when tech “gets in the way”...or does it? Let’s take a look at some OnCourse tools - and accompanying strategies - that can support our work with students’ efforts, focus, and well-being.

Navigating Travel Guidelines: Using Travel and NET Cards
Williams Center, Room S204E
Presented by Sandy Noble, Accounting

This session will explore the Pros and Cons of having a Travel and/or NET Card.  I will give an in-depth explanation as to why Office of State Comptroller (OSC) requires all the various travel forms and how University Accounting audits, processes payments to both the traveler and Citibank, and how the forms become part of our seven-year legal (record retention) files.

Reporting Services
Williams Center, Room G103B
Presented by Diane Howard, Information Technology Services

This session will demonstrate a web-based method to deliver a variety of interactive and printed reports from sources such as Accounting, Parking, Payroll, Property Control, Purchasing and SUNY HR.

Social Media and Mobile Apps: Facebook, Twitter, Uber and more
Williams Center, Room G103C
Presented by Jeffrey Woodard, Director of Public Relations

Gain the social media skills and credentials you need to drive your career and personal life. Social media and mobile apps can be incredibly powerful tools keeping you in touch with friends, family and colleagues. Never stop learning!


2:00 - 2:50: Health & Wellness

Zumba with Paul Mockovak
Dods Gymnasium (class will begin at 2:10 and end at 2:45)

Enjoy a dance session that is all about having fun with Latin American dance flavor with the hidden added perk of getting a great workout. Come and see why Zumba is so popular. We have all levels- it's all about have a great time.

Yoga with Susan Murphy
Hemingway Hall

An ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practiced for health and relaxation.

Tai Chi Demonstration with Sandra Lewis
Williams Center, Room G103A

Sun-style Tai Chi is an ancient practice proven to reduce pain and improve your mental and physical well-being. Its purpose is to empower people to wellness!


3:00 - 4:00 pm: Department Meetings

Watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads.


Naloxone (Opiod overdose) Training Session

Naloxone (Opiod overdose) Training Session
Presented by Julie Apperson, Registered Nurse, Chautauqua Co. Dept of Health & Human Services
Click here to register for Naloxone Training

Narcan is a medication used to block the effects of opioids (medications that relieve pain such as Heroin or Oxycodone) and reverses an overdose. Narcan has no effects on people who have not taken opioids. The training session will provide training on how to administer naloxone, in response to an opiod overdose.

Three sessions will be offered in Fenton, Room 105:
10:00 am - 11:30 am
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

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Moving Beyond Walls: Teaching Through Engagement

Friday, February 5, 2016

Feel free to drop-in, even if you haven't had a chance to register. Light refreshments will be served throughout the day.

The schedule in brief:

  • Health & Fitness: Yoga and Zumba 8:00 - 9:00 am; Free blood pressure screening 9:00 am - 1:00 pm; Yoga and Zumba 2:00 - 3:00 pm
  • Networking with Colleagues: 8:30 - 9:00 am
  • Breakout sessions: 9:00 - 9:50 am, 10:00 - 10:50 am, 11:00 - 11:50 am, and 12:00 - 1:50 pm
  • Featured Speaker: Why Great Writing Matters: An Interview with Randy Cronk, '72, 1:00 - 2:00 pm
  • Departmental Discussions: 3:00 - 4:00 pm (watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads)

Refreshments available throughout the day

About the Featured Speaker

A wide variety of activities are available to students as well. Please encourage your students to attend!


8:00 am - 8:50 am: Health & Wellness

Yoga with Lindsey Bauza
148 Dods Hall

Zumba with Paul
Taught by Paul Mockovak, Dept. of Theatre & Dance, Certified Zumba and Zumba Gold instructor
Dods Gym

Start your day right with some fun international dance moves. If you know Zumba!, great. If not, find out - see why it is the user friendly dance party especially for faculty, staff and employees. A 40-45 minute class where you participate at your own level to launch you into a great day. Will make sure you can get to a 9:00 am session.


9:00 am - 11:00 am:

Safe Zone 101
Presented by Jellema Stewart, Director, Center for Multicultural Affairs; Margaret McCurdy, MS, LMHC (P), Mental Health Counselor, Student Counseling Services; Amanda Pruden, Student Assistant, Center for Multicultural Affairs
Williams Center G103B

Safe Zone 101 is a two-hour introductory workshop designed to educate and empower participants to be agents of change against issues faced by individuals within the LGBTQ and MOGII community. Participants in this workshop will develop an understanding of LGBTQ and MOGII terminology and symbols, history, concepts of privilege and identity development, campus resources and reporting; while also building skills for identifying and interrupting language and behavior that may be discriminatory. The purpose of Safe Zone 101 is to create a network of supportive allies who will continue to understand and be sensitive to the varied identities within the LGBTQ and MOGII community, and who seek to foster a more respectful world for everyone. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will have the option to display a Safe Zone symbol as a visible network of support, and as a signal to the campus community, that they maintain a safe and affirming environment.


9:00 am - 1:00 pm:

As part of Healthy Heart Month, Student Health Services will be offering free blood pressure screening for faculty, staff and students, as well as information resources for keeping your heart healthy through diet and exercise. Look for their resource table outside the Williams Center S204 rooms!


9:00 am - 9:50 am:

Fredonia Applied Learning
Presented by Fredonia Applied Learning Council Members
Williams Center 204B

On May 6th, 2015, the SUNY Board of Trustees passed a resolution stating that SUNY shall develop a plan to make approved applied learning activities available to SUNY students enrolled in the 2016-17 academic year, and that this plan will include individual campus plans. To achieve this goal each campus is required to submit an Applied Learning plan that documents the types of applied learning activities available. SUNY campuses are also required to examine the feasibility of making applied learning activities a graduation requirement. This session will provide an overview of SUNY’s resolution and discuss Fredonia’s progress toward developing a campus Applied Learning plan.

Principles and Practices in Problem-based Learning
Presented by John Hausmann, Music
PDC Associates Series workshop
Williams Center 204A

Problem-based learning (PBL) “empowers learners to conduct research, integrate theory and practice, and apply knowledge and skills to develop a viable solution” to ill-defined problems. PBL is characterized by a collaborative, learner-centered approach that allows for unstructured inquiry and draws from multiple disciplines. The core element of PBL involves ill-structured instructional problems. By presenting students with real-world issues, PBL presents a strategy for instructors to bridge the pedagogical and practical while fostering higher-order critical-thinking strategies for the next generation of student-leaders.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the key ideas of problem-based learning.
  • Identify best practices in PBL.
  • Develop a strategy for integrating PBL into an existing class.

Highlighting the Best Features for OnCourse
Presented by Lisa Melohusky, Office of Online Learning
Williams Center 204C

Beginning Summer 2016 all courses at Fredonia will have access to OnCourse, which replaces ANGEL. This session will highlight some of the best new features that come with this system. Come see why you should be excited to make the switch!

Faculty Professional Affairs Committee (FPAC) Open Session
Facilitated by Heather McKeever, FPAC Chair, and members of the FPAC Committee
Williams Center 204D

The Faculty and Professional Affairs Committee (FPAC) recommends policy on campus matters relating to the welfare of the faculty and professional staff, and is a standing committee of the University Senate. Join us for this interactive forum, where committee members will be available to answer questions and take suggestions that will help prioritize FPAC's focus for the coming semester.

The New York Times at Fredonia
Presented by Cindy Yochym, Reed Library
Williams Center G103C

Reading first-hand news coverage from "the national newspaper of record" about the opening of Carnegie Hall, passage of the 19th Amendment, celebration of VE Day, or tension of the Cuban Missile Crisis? With Fredonia's academic subscription to The New York Times, Fredonia students, faculty, and staff can read reports about these historic events, as well as the entire newspaper issues in which they were published, without charge from their office or home! This session focuses on the capabilities of searching the digital archive (back to 1851) of The New York Times. Mention will also be made of other benefits we enjoy here at Fredonia, such as The New York Times in Education program, the "Lunch with The New York Times" series, and the availability of current weekday issues of The New York Times in print at various locations on campus.

Secretaries Forum
Facilitated by Judy Horowitz, Associate Provost
Williams Center 204E

In this session, campus secretaries are invited to join in a discussion to share ideas, workflows, and best practices for success in the workplace.


10:00 - 10:50 am:

Getting Started with a Long-Distance Student Internship
Panel Discussion with Randy Cronk, '72 (English), founder of greatwriting; Tracy Collingwood, Career Development Office; Dr. Ann Siegle Drege, English; W. Dean Furness, ’16 (M.A., Interdisciplinary Studies)
Williams Center 204B

This panel will explore the learning outcomes, logistics, and lessons learned from years of long-distance student internships with Randy Cronk at greatwriting. Panelists will discuss the issues and opportunities that arise while connecting with a non-local community partner; setting up a learning contract; mentoring, supervising, and evaluating student interns; and reflecting on challenges and successes.

Big Data Across the Disciplines: Modernizing the Curriculum and Enhancing the Scholarship
Presented by Dr. Reneta Barneva followed by a Round Table. Confirmed participants in the Round Table: Dr. Lisa Walters (School of Business, Fredonia); Drs. Patrick Hung, Bill Kapralos (University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada); Dr. Kamen Kanev (Shizuoka University, Japan)
Williams Center 204A

A larger amount of recorded data was created in the last 20 years than in the whole human history. The information extracted from it is used in various ways and is quickly transforming our world. The universities are preparing the future workforce and if we would like our graduates to be successful, we have to empower them with Big Data analytics skills. While the skills and tools for data analytics are common, their implementation is discipline-specific. After a brief introduction of Big Data, various applications will be considered and possibilities of including elements of Big Data in different disciplines will be discussed.

Who's Afraid of Stefan Zweig?: Stimulating Undergraduate Research Across the Disciplines
Presented by Dr. Birger Vanwesenbeeck, English
Williams Center G103 C
BYOD! Bring your own device for this hands-on workshop.

This learning practice aims to instruct Fredonia faculty on integrating archival materials in their classes in order to create high-impact learning opportunities for students to do undergraduate research. The learning objectives of this workshop are threefold:

1. to provide faculty with an overview of how the primary archival materials might be used to stimulate undergraduate research across the disciplines;

2. to offer specific strategies and skills to monolingual English speakers for working with archival documents in languages other than English;

3. to provide faculty with a hands-on exercise of how archival research and assignments might be incorporated into their course syllabi and classes.

Archival research practice and pedagogy will be demonstrated with a focus on Fredonia's Stefan Zweig collection. A world-famous collection without peer within the SUNY system, the Stefan Zweig archive contains thousands of hand-written documents and personalia directly related to the many life-altering historical events that its author lived through, from World War I to the holocaust; from the advent of the artistic movement known as Modernism to the experience of exile.

Brushing up on Banner
Presented by Scott Saunders and Kristin Dobmeier, Office of the Registrar
Williams Center 204D

Fredonia has been live on Banner since the summer of 2000. We have evolved, modified and adapted many of our daily practices and procedures based on the functionality of our student record database. Let’s gather together and brush up on some of our Banner skills, ask questions, see what might be new that might assist us further and talk about where Banner is heading. This session is designed for academic department secretaries and chairs who utilize Banner on a regular basis.

Why Google, when we have OnCourse?
Presented by Dr. Kathleen Gradel, Education
Williams Center 204C

So, we have a new Learning Management System - OnCourse. How does Google fit, or is good just for email, Calendar, and "Googling it"? This session hits on a core set of Why's, along with parallel examples, to get at students' functional use of Google for learning and interaction in their courses and their studies. We will feature examples embedded in OnCourse, to show how the two can mesh.

Resilience
Presented by Christopher Taverna, Professional Development Center
Williams Center 204E

As a participant in this session you will increase your knowledge and ability to:

  • Bounce back from adversity.
  • Build your self-esteem as a foundation of resilience.
  • Make and maintain connections to build resilience.
  • Accept and embrace change.
  • Use flexible thinking to overcome obstacles.
  • Implement stress management and relaxation strategies to maintain resilience.

Tools of Engagement Project (TOEP) Information Session
Presented by Katrina Fulcher & McLoddy Kadyamusuma, Communication Disorders & Sciences
Williams Center G103A

Interested in learning about instructional technologies that can be used to help engage students? Then the Tools of Engagement Project (TOEP) is just what you need.

Explore and reflect on innovative and creative uses of online instructional technologies through a set of hands-on, self-paced, discovery activities. The TOEP community provides a safe and supportive environment to work alongside peers and to reflect on how these emerging technology tools may impact teaching and learning.

Join our campus TOEP Fellows to see how faculty across SUNY are integrating these tools into their courses, and learn how to get started with the TOEP community.


11:00 - 11:50 am:

Teaching with Your Head in the Cloud: Using Google Drive to Structure Your Course
Dr. Susan Sturm and Dr. Kathleen Magiera, College of Education
Williams Center 204C

Two instructors, experienced and novice, will explain how they have transformed their classrooms using GoogleDrive. The session will include tips and how-to instructions for setting up your class structure using the GoogleDrive suite of tools, GoogleDocs, GoogleSlideshow, and GoogleSheets. Discussion will focus on how GoogleDrive can enhance communication between instructors and students, streamline assignment submission and collaboration, and provide students with essential technology skills through practical application. All attendees will gain access to a sample course on GoogleDrive as a guide for course set up.

More Than Just Editing: Teaching Global Revision in Writing
Presented by Dr. Susan Spangler, English
Williams Center 103C

This workshop will introduce participants to several methods by which their students can truly transform their writing instead of merely "fixing" surface errors. Participants will engage in these activities during the workshop to develop an understanding of what students will experience in the classroom and will leave with at least four ideas to incorporate revision into their writing assignments.

Navigating Travel Guidelines
Presented by Sandy Noble, Accounting
Williams Center 204A

This session will navigate the basic rules of travel. I will present a guide on how to successfully plan, execute, and close a business trip. We will explore options such as Travel, NET, and Procurement card purchases, purchase order, and/or out-of-pocket reimbursement. We will also review the most recent travel rules changes and conclude with Q&A.

Introduction to Myers-Briggs Type Preferences in the Workplace
Presented by Christopher Taverna, Professional Development Center
Williams Center 204E

As a participant in this session you will increase your knowledge and ability to:

  • Recognize the four dichotomies of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
  • Identify the four temperaments of type.
  • Determine your type preferences.
  • Understand how your preferences can affect your work in such areas as:
    • Problem Solving
    • Conflict Resolution
    • Goal Setting
    • Time Management
    • Stress Management

Title IX and Sexual Violence: Understanding your responsibility as an employee
Ms. Julie Bezek - Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Coordinator Dr. Bill Boerner - Chief Diversity Officer & Title IX Coordinator Ms. Lisa Newell - Director of Judicial Affairs
Williams Center 204D

Sexual violence prevention and response has received critical attention in higher education and NY State. This session will outline the new state laws regulating the campus response as well as review expectations for all employees related to supporting an environment free from sexual violence. On campus resources will also be shared including how to respond if someone reports an incident of sexual violence.

Advising Study Abroad Students
Presented by Erin Willis, Office of International Education
Williams Center 103B

Studying abroad is a fantastic growth opportunity that affects students cognitively and personally. As a faculty advisor, what is the best way to advise and support Fredonia students that have study abroad in their academic plan? Erin Willis, Assistant Director of Study Abroad & Exchange Programs, will lead a discussion for advisors to learn:

1. Basic advisement/Academic mapping

2. Helping students find coursework

3. Academic approval process

4. Supporting students when they return

Research & Creative Activities Forum
Presented by Brian Boisvert, World Languages & Cultures; William Brown, Biology; Xin Fan, History; Katrina Fulcher, Communication Disorders & Sciences; Christina Jarvis, English; McCloddy Kadyamusuma, Communication Disorders & Sciences; Heather McEntarfer, English; Julie Newell, Music; Jill Reese, Music Education; Courtney Wigdahl, Biology. Facilitated by Judy Horowitz, Associate Provost
Williams Center 204B

Faculty recipients of the 2015 Summer Research & Creativity Award will discuss the research and creative projects that they currently have underway.


12:00 - 12:50:

Introduction to Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL)
Panel Presentation with Naomi Baldwin, International Education; Bond Benton, Communication; Michael Jabot, Education; and Ivani Vassoler, Politics and International Affairs
Williams Center 204E


"SUNY COIL has developed an approach to fostering cross-cultural student competence through development of multicultural learning environments that link university or college classes in different countries. In the COIL model, students from different cultures enroll in shared courses with faculty members from each country co-teaching and managing coursework." In this session faculty who are currently partnered with university campuses in Brazil and Mexico will share their experiences with the COIL model in their classrooms. A brief overview of the nuts and bolts of getting involved with SUNY COIL Network will be provided, along with time for Q&A.

PowerPoint Overload: Ideas for Effective Powerpoint Use in Lectures
Presented by Dr. Michael Scialdone
Williams Center 204C

This session is designed to provide basic guidelines regarding the design and use of PowerPoint presentations for instructors, geared toward enhancing and improving student engagement during lecture-style class sessions.

Exploring the Role of Collegiality on Campus
Roundtable Discussion facilitated by Bill Brown, Biology; Rob Deemer, Music; Stephen Kershnar, Philosophy; Scott Medler, Biology; Rebha Sabharwal, Sociocultural and Justice Sciences; and Iclal Vanwesenbeeck, English
Williams Center 204A

This roundtable discussion will provide a brief history of collegiality and its place in the academic world. Discussion will be followed by audience Q&A.
 

Introduction to using the R software system for data analysis​
Presented by Darrin Rogers, Psychology
Williams Center 103C

BYOD! Bring your own device for this hands-on workshop.

The free, open-source software system R has become one of the most widely-used platforms for data analysis and related tasks in the world, and has become important in the movement toward open data and reproducible research. R is amazingly flexible and powerful, but the initial learning curve can be daunting for first-time users. This workshop will introduce you to the software, help you understand the scope of what R can be used for, walk you through the initial steps required to begin analyzing data and producing graphs, and provide resources for finding help and solving problems. This will be a hands-on workshop, with attendees directly using R. If you bring your own laptop, save time by installing R before the workshop from https://cran.r-project.org.


How to Help A Colleague Who is Troubled or Distressed

Sue Murphy, Employee Assistance Program
Williams Center 204B

We work and study in an environment in which we are constantly striving for excellence and high performance, a situation that may contribute to stress. We all cope in different ways at different times. Early recognition, intervention, and referral are critical to getting someone help and preventing violence on campus. Taking action can save a job, a career- or a life. Join us as we discuss how to approach and facilitate assistance for a colleague in need.
 

Understanding Degree Works
Presented by Kristin Dobmeier, Office of the Registrar
Williams Center 103B

Degree Works is here to assist with the advising of your students. It is an online tool that looks at your student’s program (majors, minors, concentrations) and how their academic experiences are meeting the prescribed requirements. This session, designed for academic advisors, will review navigation, how requirements are displayed and much more!
 

Innovation, Engagement & Team Building
Presented William Haskas and Andrew Nisbet, +FARM Network Members and affiliate clients of the Fredonia Technology Incubator
Williams Center 204D

Learn how art and technology lead to positive community development utilizing technology to build better neighborhoods. This will be a conversation William Haskas, Brooklyn architect and co-founder of Plus Farm, a design and construction studio. In this session participants will explore how innovations in technology lead to smarter, more sustainable practices in the everyday build world. Plus Farm is a team of artists, designers, architects, builders and craftsmen that collectively teach listening, learning and sharing through making.


1:00 - 1:50:

Why Great Writing Matters: An Interview with Randy Cronk, '72
WNYF-televised interview by Fredonia President Virginia Horvath with Randy Cronk, '72 (English), founder of greatwriting. Kevin Kearns, Vice President for Engagement and Economic Development, and Tracy Collingwood, Director of the Career Development Office, will join the conversation.
Williams Center Multipurpose Room

This interview will explore the distinctiveness, value, and meaning of the Fredonia experience through a conversation about Randy Cronk's life and career, the development of his business, greatwriting, and the implications for Fredonia's future with engaged learning and economic development.

Students, faculty, staff and member of the community are welcome and encouraged to attend!

Featured Speaker:

A Fredonia alumnus, Randy Cronk has over 30 years’ experience writing about complex systems, products, and services. After starting out as a tech writer at Digital Equipment Corporation, Randy went on to become a vice president at Hill and Knowlton (the world's largest PR firm at the time) and later a vice president at the renowned Silicon Valley tech marketing firm, Regis McKenna, Inc.

Since founding greatwriting in 1990, Randy has worked with more than 250 technology and innovation-based organizations. He helps his clients convey the value of their products and services through white papers, websites, brochures, case studies, articles and blogs.

Randy also blogs and podcasts for the MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge where he orchestrates and markets events as a member of the Forum's Innovation Series Committee. A global audience tunes in over 28,000 times each month to the Forum's iTunes podcast series that he started and produces. He also enjoys mentoring college students in his paid internship program.
 

Thank you to our event sponsors! Fredonia Alumni Association, Fredonia College Foundation, Fredonia College Foundation's Carnahan Jackson Humanities Fund, Department of History, and the Mary Louise White Fund.
 

This program is the first event in the Writers@Work (Alumni Writers in Residence) Series, a partnership between the Departments of Business, English, and History, Alumni Affairs, and the Career Development Office.


2:00 - 2:50: Health & Wellness

Yoga with Lindsey Bauza
148 Dods Hall

Zumba with Paul
Taught by Paul Mockovak, Dept. of Theatre & Dance, Certified Zumba and Zumba Gold instructor
Dods Gym

End your day right with some fun international dance moves. If you know Zumba!, great. If not, find out - see why it is the user friendly dance party. A 40-45 minute class where you participate at your own level to launch you into the remainder of your day with a smile.


3:00 - 4:00 pm: Department Meetings

Watch for details on these activities from your chairs, deans and department heads.

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Moving Beyond Walls: Teaching Through Engagement

Wednesday, September 16, 2015


Morning Schedule:

Refreshments & Informal Networking
Williams Center Multi-purpose Room

8:00 – 9:00 am

Yoga with Lindsey Bauza  
Dods Hall Gym

9:00 am – 12:00 pm


Visioning Session: Fredonia as an Engaged Community

9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Facilitated by BethMarie Ward & Constance Foster, Regenerate Group, LCC (click for facilitator bios)
S204 A & B, Williams Center

What should Fredonia look like as an engaged community? In this facilitated planning workshop, participants will have the opportunity to discuss campus engagement activities in order to develop a successful and sustainable model for the future. Through this participatory experience, members of the campus community will have the opportunity to focus intention into actionable plans. Please consider attending if you have an interest applied learning strategies such as: internships, service learning, community service, civic engagement, entrepreneurship, field experiences, and study abroad.

This event is sponsored in partnership by the Division of Economic Engagement and the Office of the Provost.


Breakout Sessions:

Balancing Priorities: How to Successfully Manage Tasks, Deadlines, and Expectations
Presented by Christopher Taverna
Williams Center
9:00 am – 10:50 am

In our increasingly competitive world, we all need to be more productive than ever. Not only must we do our jobs in less time and with fewer resources, we often work for more than one boss and on more than one team. As a result, we may face conflicting tasks, deadlines, and expectations, making it difficult to identify what’s most important. Furthermore, the transformations in our workplaces brought about by technology have, in addition to the many benefits, increased the speed and complexity of our work.

This workshop will enable you to properly prioritize your obligations, allowing you to improve performance and productivity. As a result, you’ll also achieve a better work/life balance, minimize the stress related to managing your tasks efficiently, and, ultimately, improve working relationships.
 

Effective Communication and Team Building
Presented by Sue Murphy, EAP Coordinator
10:00 – 11:50 am

This activity is designed to spark reflection about how groups communicate with each other, varying perspectives, leadership, how participants deal with frustration and what roles they take on in the group.
 

Rethinking Assessment through the Tuning Project: Lessons from a Faculty-Led Initiative
Presented by David Kinkela, Associate Professor, History
Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 11:00 am – 11:50 am

The American Historical Association's Tuning Project is is a national effort to define what history majors should know upon graduating from college. Funded by the Lumina Foundation, this project does not aim to standardize curricula in history, but seeks to frame common goals-and reference points for measuring progress toward those goals-for post-secondary history education. Tuning is a faculty-led project that attempts to draw on the unique strength of individual programs and departments across the nation. Yet, tuning is not specific to history and can be incorporated within any discipline.

This workshop will underscore the potential for tuning to recast assessment into a process that is meaningful and faculty-led. As one of the sixty participants in the Tuning Project, I have spearheaded our department's efforts to "tune" our program. At its core, tuning can help departments better define themselves to various constituents and stakeholders within the beyond the academy and can led to meaningful faculty-led assessment. This session will be used to share what we have learned (and continue to learn) about tuning to our campus community. It will define "tuning" to participants unfamiliar with the process and will highlight the value of participating in this faculty-led initiative.

Learning objectives: - define Tuning and to recognize its potential impact on assessment - identify key characteristics within their own program that draws on the tuning processes
 

Ditching the Dull - Dynamic Design Strategies For Teamwork in the Classroom
A PDC Associates Series Workshop
Monday, March 23, 2015, 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Presented by Roslin Smith, Assistant Professor, Communication
PDC Bonsai Room, 120 Reed Library

In this interactive workshop participants will examine team dynamics and explore several ways to incorporate teamwork in the classroom. Sample activities will be modeled and attendees are encouraged to have fun while engaging in short teamwork exercises.

Learning objectives:

1) To explore various team building activities that encourage learning processes

2) How to use teamwork in the evaluation process


Lunchtime Offerings:

Lunch will be provided for faculty & staff registered for a 12:00 – 1:00 pm session.

Advising Study Abroad Students

Studying abroad is a fantastic growth opportunity that affects students cognitively and personally. As a faculty advisor, what is the best way to advise and support Fredonia students that have study abroad in their academic plan? Erin Willis, Assistant Director of Study Abroad & Exchange Programs, will lead a discussion for advisors to learn:

1. Basic advisement/Academic mapping

2. Helping students find coursework

3. Academic approval process

4. Supporting students when they return
 

Preferred Name Policy
Presented by Jennifer Hildebrand members of the Preferred Name Taskforce

In multicultural education course, we discuss many controversial, often times, uncomfortable issues, such as racism, white privileges, and gender orientation etc. In order to engage students in learning such issues and actively embracing diversity, I use positive thinking as an anticipatory activity for each class. Positive thinking is one of the components of positive psychology, which “explores the factors that make life worth living, such as happiness, through the study of positive emotions, positive character strengths, and positive institutions” (Lyson, 2009). Research suggests that positive emotion reduces at least some racial biases (Johnson & Fredrickson, 2005). The opening exercises we do at the beginning of each class include: 1) say a positive comment about yourself, your peers, or your instructor; and 2) tell me something new and exciting. What I found was that by practicing positive thinking my students were more open and comfortable to discuss controversial issues.
 

Student Engagement & High Impact Teaching Practices

In multicultural education course, we discuss many controversial, often times, uncomfortable issues, such as racism, white privileges, and gender orientation etc. In order to engage students in learning such issues and actively embracing diversity, I use positive thinking as an anticipatory activity for each class. Positive thinking is one of the components of positive psychology, which “explores the factors that make life worth living, such as happiness, through the study of positive emotions, positive character strengths, and positive institutions” (Lyson, 2009). Research suggests that positive emotion reduces at least some racial biases (Johnson & Fredrickson, 2005). The opening exercises we do at the beginning of each class include: 1) say a positive comment about yourself, your peers, or your instructor; and 2) tell me something new and exciting. What I found was that by practicing positive thinking my students were more open and comfortable to discuss controversial issues.
 

Travel & Procurement Card Procedures with Sandy Noble


Health & Wellness:

Campus Walk with Sue Murphy
(12:30 – 1:00 pm, lunch available from 12:00 – 12:30 for those who pre-register)


Afternoon Schedule:

Engaging Students in Advising
Presented by Andrea Zevenbergen, Psychology and Amy Leclair, Coordinator of Advising & Liberal Arts
1:00 – 1:50 pm

Appropriate, comprehensive advising has been found to be predictive of higher retention and graduation of students. Advising is part of teaching; faculty and professionals have the opportunity to teach students program and career-specific information, as well as decision-making skills. This presentation will discuss models of student advising, and strategies which can be incorporated into advising such as collaborative goal-setting, problem-solving, and helping students move toward positive changes when needed. Session participants will be provided examples of resources such as advising syllabi, advising checklists, sample advising communications with students, and information related to Degree Works. The session will also include time for participants to develop their own rationales for advising which can be included in an advising syllabus, and key questions for use in advising sessions with students.
 

Engaging with Identity, Bias, and Microaggressions
Presenter: Dr. Bill Boerner, Chief Diversity Officer

Understanding our identities and how to engage with others who are different is critical for the work environment. Join colleges in an exploration of our identities and how these may shape bias. This workshop style session will ask participants to challenge their assumptions and gain insights into each other’s identities, particularly those we may hide in our professional roles. Participants will also discuss working across difference and how to approach instances of bias and microaggressions in the workplace.
 

The Thrills, Challenges and Lessons from Engaging Students in the Community

A cross discipline panel will share their thoughts and lessons they have learned from engaging students in the community on structured learning projects. Topics to be cover include but are not limited to sourcing opportunities, relationship with community contact, logistics, student challenges, faculty challenges, assessment and follow-up. Participants will be encouraged to join the dialog with their own experiences and questions. Disciplines included Business, English, Arts and Education.
 

Establishing Short-Term Study Abroad Programs (Round-Table Discussion)
Cameron Broderick, EF College Tours

Usually the presentations/roundtables are about 1 hour long and are pretty informal. I don’t like to play up the EF piece too much, but rather make recommendations on best study abroad models for what they are looking to teach. I usually like to cover:

1. How to associate a course with a faculty-led program

2. Approval processes (at school)

3. Program Models

4. EF and our work with SUNY


2:00 – 2:50

Designing Effective Writing Assignments

Workshop participants will:

  • Analyze current writing assignments from their courses
  • Consider rhetorical elements of realistic writing assignments
  • Revise current writing assignments to reflect those rhetorical elements
  • Discover ways to teach students to interpret assignment constraints

In small groups, participants will share current assignments. After a gallery walk featuring rhetorical elements to consider when writing, participants will have work time to revise their assignments. We will have a large-group discussion to offer ways to teach students selected rhetorical elements.

Using Case Studies in the Classroom
A PDC Associates Series Workshop
Presented by Scott Medler, Biology

Case-based learning has a long history of being used in areas including law and medicine, and more recently has been used in STEM education. Case studies provide a great tool to focus more deeply on complex issues, as well as serving as a way to engage students in discussions. There is a major effort in STEM education to move away from traditional lecturing-based teaching, and case studies provide one tool to add variety to classroom learning.

In this seminar, Dr. Medler will provide an introduction to the case-based method, and will actively engage participants with a case study in order to highlight some of the ways that cases can be used in the classroom. Dr. Medler has been using case studies his biology courses for at least 10 years, and recently attended the NSF National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science at the University at Buffalo.
 

Safe Computing at Work and Home
Presented by Christopher Taverna

Faculty Writing Groups
Presented by Katrina Fulcher

Yoga with Lindsey Bauza
Dods Hall Gym

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2014 - 2015 Professional Development Days

Fredonia is a community of learning in which faculty and staff recognize the importance of modeling lifelong learning for our students. As such, two days were designated in the 2014-2015 academic calendar, during which faculty and staff from all divisions were encouraged to participate in campus-wide professional development dialogues and activities.

Fredonia's Spring 2015 "Professional Development Day" was held on Friday, February 6, 2015. A wide variety of activities were available for students as well. Click here for the Student Activity Schedule


 

Framing the Future: Helping Students Succeed

Friday, February 6, 2015

Click Here for a Printable "Schedule At a Glance"

Topics Offered:

Health & Wellness:

Yoga with Lindsey Bauza

Introduction to LehrerDance technique
with Jon Lehrer and the LehrerDance company

LehrerDance is an inspiring and innovative professional dance company based in Buffalo, NY. Under the direction of Jon Lehrer, the company showcases Jon’s unique choreography and embodies his definitive style. Jon’s extensive background in both the modern and jazz dance idioms fosters choreography that is organic, artistic, accessible and often humorous, reflecting life experience and the human condition.

Happiness Advantage
with Christopher Taverna, Professional Development Center

The Happiness Advantage training video gives you a formula for improving productivity, overcoming challenges, increasing cognitive abilities, and improving teamwork – all while improving your mindset. This comprehensive training program is based on Shawn Achor's book, The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work

Ballroom Dance
with Jon Lehrer and the LehrerDance company

Drugs of Abuse Used by Today’s College Students
Michele Caliva, RN, Director of Upstate Poison Control Center
Janette Zhu, RN, Professional Education Coordinator, Upstate Poison Control Center

This program provided an open discussion regarding new drugs that have been introduced and used primarily by the 20 to 40 year old populations throughout communities within New York State. The presenters also encouraged dialogue with the attendees to gather data representative of drugs found in the community in which they are presenting. The program would particularly benefit emergency response personnel, including Building Safety Coordinators, CERT members, University Police, Residence Hall directors, custodians, counselors and anyone who works with students or shares an interest in this topic.


High Impact Teaching Practices:

Building Living Learning Communities: Lessons from the four years of the Honor House
with Dave Kinkela, History; and Honors Students Jacob Schermerhorn, Julianna Grabowski, and Ken Starr

Since 2011, the Honors Program has developed a strong residential component to its academic mission. The Honors House exists to expand the classroom experience by integrating learning through campus and community engagement. Students have the opportunity to be in an environment with other students who like academic challenges and that enriches their learning through special programs with faculty and staff, visiting speakers, cultural activities and events, service projects, and shared meals. This session was designed to highlight some of the High Impact Practices of the Honors House, while reflecting on some of the difficulties in creating a vibrant living and learning community (LLC) on campus. It also drew on the literature on High-Impact Practices to address how we can better integrate classroom learning in a non-classroom environment.

Teaching Writing vs. Assigning Writing: Writing Process Elements in the Classroom
with Susan Spangler, English

The purpose of this Workshop was to have participants 1) examine their personal writing processes 2) learn new writing process elements 3) articulate methods for teaching writing process elements instead of merely assigning writing projects. Participants were to draw their writing process in order to engage in a discussion about their own writing processes. In small groups, participants looked for similarities and differences in their processes and begin to articulate writing process elements. A handout was provided on descriptions of teaching writing vs. assigning writing. Participants were to articulateways they could incorporate the "teaching writing" descriptions into their own courses in their department

Engaging Undergraduate Students in Research
with Scott Medler, Biology

Engaging Undergraduate Students in Research Undergraduate (UG) research provides students with valuable experience that enriches their understanding of basic processes they’ve learned about in the classroom, and exposes them to the process of science. Several studies have shown that UG research experiences result in gains in critical thinking, oral and written communication skills, personal and professional development, and a better understanding of how science works as a process. In this seminar, a focus on the history and definitions of authentic undergraduate research, and then present examples of some of the ‘best practices’ that can be taken from successful models of UG research. The goal of this workshop was to engage attending faculty and administrators in an active discussion about how to facilitate meaningful undergraduate research at Fredonia.

Talking about Race and Racism in the Classroom
with Bill Boerner, Chief Diversity Officer & Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, and Jeffry Iovannone, Women & Gender Studies Coordinator

With an increasingly diverse population of students at Fredonia, our classrooms are becoming opportunities for interracial interactions which may spark racial micro-aggressions and difficult dialogues. Session participants explored these dynamics as well as strategized effective ways to approach incidents of racism in the classroom and co-curricular environment.

From Global to Local, and Keep them Local: Strategies to Recruit and Retain International Students Part I
with Guangyu Tan, Curriculum & Instruction

Learning objectives were as follows: 1) The audience will know the trend of globalization of higher education. 2) The audience will learn the strategies to attract and recruit potential students, especially international students. Methods used: 1) statistics to demonstrate the trend of globalization of higher education. 2) personal accounts to discuss what matters to international students when it comes to choose a higher education institution in the United States.

Ditching the Dull - Dynamic Design Strategies for Teamwork in the Classroom
with Roslin Smith, Communication

In this interactive workshop participants examined team dynamics and explored several ways to incorporate teamwork in the classroom. Sample activities were modeled. Attendees were encouraged to have fun while engaging in short teamwork exercises.

Learning objectives: 1) To explore various team building activities that encourage learning processes 2) How to use teamwork in the evaluation process


Discussion Forums:

Framing the Questions: What Does it Mean to be a Community of Learners?

Colleagues from across campus were encouraged to join lively discussions focused on what it means to be a student-centered campus. This was a time to share thoughts and ideas, along with the opportunity to connect with others while exploring different ways of thinking about teaching, learning and working.

Instructional Innovations Forum
with Kimberly Conti, Mathematical Sciences; Mike Jabot, Curriculum and Instruction; Tiffany Nicely, Music; David Stellhorn, Theatre & Dance; and Peter Tucker, Visual Arts & New Media

Faculty from across the disciplines shared stories of how they have innovated their classrooms with activities and technologies designed to enhance student learning. Colleagues were encouraged to come hear what others were doing, and to feel free to bounce ideas off of others in this free-flowing discussion.

Research & Creative Activities Forum
with Catherine Creeley, Psychology; Timothy Frerichs, Visual Arts & New Media; Natalie Gerber, English; Judith Horowitz, Associate Provost for Graduate Studies, Sponsored Research & Faculty Development; Sam Mason, Chemistry; Joseph McFall, Psychology; Paul Murphy, Music; Jonathan Titus, Biology; Emily VanDette, English; and Birger Vanwesenbeeck, English

Faculty from across the disciplines discussed research and creative projects that they currently have underway.

"Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) Forum
with Lisa Melohusky, on behalf of the Information Technology Advisory Board

In Fall 2014, ITAB (Instructional Technology Advisory Board, http://www.fredonia.edu/its/itab/) formed several task forces to investigate some of the high profile technology topics on campus. One of the groups created was charged with investigating the development of goals and objectives for instructional technology. This task force has begun by focusing on BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) and would like your feedback and ideas on devices being used, support and training needs, and high impact teaching methods impacted by BYOD. This was a discussion on current ways BYOD is being used in the classroom and to help create a wish list that would support future teaching.

General Education Assessment Roundtable Discussion: From Accountability to Quality Enhancement
with Lisa Hunter, Curriculum, Assessment, and Academic Support; Joseph McFall, Psychology; Kathleen Magiera, Education; and Justin Conroy, Physics

Assessment of general education is often viewed as a way to ensure that institutional goals are being met. However, truly meaningful assessment typically happens when the assessment results lead to ways to strengthen and improve the program. This workshop explored this important topic from multiple campus perspectives.

Academic Department Secretaries Forum
with Christopher Taverna and members of the Secretary’s Professional Development Committee

In this session, Academic Department Secretaries were invited to join in a discussion to share ideas, workflows, and best practices for success in the workplace.


Campus Information Sessions:

Success with Google
with Christopher Taverna, Technology Training Coordinator

Are you curious about ways you might use Google Apps better? Are you tired of making do with inefficient work-arounds? Are you looking for ways to have Google work for you instead of against you?

Christopher Taverna shared his expertise using Google Apps. This session was a fast-paced, fun, and functional demonstration of the big three of Google Apps - Mail, Calendar, and Drive. New tips and tricks to get the most out of Google Apps were demonstrated with a question and answer period immediately following.

Campus Update on Title IX and Sexual Violence
with Bill Boerner, Chief Diversity Officer & Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Title IX Coordinator

Members of the Fredonia campus community have the right to live, learn, and work in an environment that is free from sexual violence and harassment. This session highlighted Title IX regulations, the new SUNY policies regarding Sexual Violence response and prevention, as well as sharing resources available to support students.

Advising Information and Course Proposal Forms for Academic Affairs Secretaries
with Amy Leclair, Coordinator of Academic Advising and Liberal Arts, and Joseph Straight, Chair of the Academic Affairs Committee

Best practices for handling advising and course proposal forms were shared, with time provided for Q&A.

Branding 101: Understanding the Dos and Don'ts of using Fredonia's new name and logo
with Mike Barone, Director of Marketing and Communications, Patty Herkey, Communications Designer and Erin Ehman, Graphic Designer

The Creative Design Team walked attendees through the many issues they should consider when creating or using any print or electronic communication materials which contain the university's brand. Logo formats, fonts, color schemes and more were discussed, and helpful tips were shared to ensure that department's materials look as professional as one would expect from the third-largest four-year university in Western New York.

NET & Travel Cards Refresher
with Sandy Noble, Director of University Accounting

In this session, Net & Travel Card procedures were reviewed, along with the opportunity to have questions answered.


Writing Workshop:

Developing Daily Writing Strategies to Help Push You Towards Publication
with Katrina Fulcher-Rood and Anny Castilla-Earl, Communication Disorders & Sciences

This workshop focused on creating daily writing habits that will help in the academic writing process for publications, methodologies, and grants. Strategies from the books: How to Write A Lot, Becoming an Academic Writer: 50 Exercises for paced, productive, and powerful writing, and Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks: A Guide to academic publishing success. This workshop gave participants practice, templates, and exercises on how to infuse academic writing into their daily work life. In addition, interested participants learned about available writing groups that can serve as a resource for their productive writing.

Learning Objectives:

• After engaging in this talk, participants would be able to identify at minimum two writing exercises that will aid them in being proficient academic writers

• At the end of the presentation, participants would be able to understand the function of a writing group and if it is an appropriate tool for them to utilize in the production of academic writing

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Framing the Future: Helping Students Succeed

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Transformative Learning Experiences by Design

with Dr. Roxanne Cullen, Ferris State University

Dr. Roxanne Cullen is a Professor of English in the Language and Literature Department at Ferris State University. Since joining the faculty in 1983 she has also served as the Director for the Writing Center, administrative head of Department Head of Language and Literature, Interim Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and Associate Vice President for Operations and Assessment. Currently she teaches a wide variety of writing courses while also serving as program coordinator for Liberal arts and the Bachelor of Integrative Studies. ​She has co-authored two books, Leading the Learner-Centered Campus and The Learner-Centered Curriculum: Design and Implementation as well as numerous articles on learner-centered pedagogy. 

Remarks on Retention & Student Success at Fredonia
with Provost Terry Brown

Terry Brown is the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Fredonia, the State University of New York, where she has served since July 2013. She previously served for almost twenty-five years in the University of Wisconsin System, as a faculty member, dean, and provost on two campuses and as an academic planner in the UW System office in Madison. She has extensive experience in academic planning, program development, curricular revision and faculty development. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Florida. Her B.A. and M.A. degrees in English were attained at Virginia Tech. 


Breakout Sessions:

Communicating Across Cultures
Presented by: Dr. Daniela Peterka-Benton, Criminal Justice, and Dr. Bond Benton, Communication

This program will focus on improving competency in intercultural communication. Learning objectives and outcomes will include:

  • Improved understanding of cultural differences
  • Development of strategies to manage cultural differences
  • Identification of cultural values
  • Application of cultural values to understanding actions and behaviors
  • Exploration of the concept of intercultural competence -Application of intercultural competence to concrete circumstances

The scenarios and role plays used for the seminar have been developed and incorporated in various trainings and courses delivered to broad constituencies throughout the world.

Learning More About Our Students
Presented by Dan Tramuta, Associate Vice President for Enrollment Services; Xiao Zhang, Institutional Research, Planning and Assessment, and Erin Mroczka, Director of First Year and Transition Programs

This session will provide a greater understanding of who our students are and why they choose Fredonia. Retention data will be shared, as well as information on why students choose to leave. 

Academic Advising: Theory, Application and Beyond
Presented by Amy Leclair, Coordinator of Academic Advising and Liberal Arts; Helen Leysath, Transfer Coordinator; and Dr. Lisa Walters, Business Administration

This session will explore academic advising as it relates to retention by presenting the body of literature relating to successfully advising. It will further provide a student center model of advising, tools to implement the model and provide a view into the future of advising at Fredonia. 

Understanding Retention Issues for Underrepresented Students
Presented by Dr. Bill Boerner, Chief Diversity Officer

Research has demonstrated an urgent concern regarding the retention of minority students in higher education, which also holds true to the Fredonia population. The University has supported strong enrollment growth from historically underrepresented students, yet retention has not seen the same gains. This session will explore national trends in minority student persistence as well as consider ideas for local impact.

In Their Own Words: Strategies for Working Effectively with Our International Students
Presented by Cynthia Carlson, Language, Learning & Leadership

The presentation will begin with a short, interactive Prezi where international students from countries such as Puerto Rico, South Korea, Japan, and China describe their first reactions to an American college campus. Then, participants will explore international students’ perspectives on teaching & learning in the U.S., including; professors, grading, assignments, learning focus, and classroom discourse, as students compare our teaching and learning styles with those of their country of origin in an engaging set of materials-- an eye-opening student publication booklet that participants can take with them. Next, we will continue actively engaging participants by exploring some myths and quick do’s and don'ts, and end by practicing 4 practical research-based strategies for faculty and staff to keep in mind when working with international students. Outcomes include increasing quality learning environments through faculty awareness of and sensitivity to international students’ needs, perspectives and expectations, as well as insights into how to communicate their own course 6 expectations effectively to international students. Faculty will add several strategies to their repertoire that will have a positive impact on diverse students.


Responding to Distressed and At Risk Students
Presented by Dr. Tracy Stenger and Dr. Leanna White, Counseling Center

Many college students experience high levels of stress and a significant number of students have their education disrupted by psychological problems and difficult life events. When these issues go unaddressed, the results can be serious and include academic failure, or even withdrawal from the university. Faculty and staff members are often the first to notice when students are having serious trouble and many students go first to faculty or staff for help. >This session will provide faculty and staff with helpful strategies for responding to distressed and at risk students. Information on services provided by the Counseling Center staff in assisting you with responding to students in crisis will also be provided.

Creating a Positive Service Environment for Students & Colleagues
Presented by Christopher Taverna, Professional Development Center

The ability to provide consistent and fantastic support services to students has a important and beneficial impact on student retention. In this session, participants will learn to recognize positive individual and team behaviors, identify negative behaviors, practice listening, and individually assess positive behaviors.

Learner Centered Teaching Strategies for Online, Blended and Web Enhanced Courses
Presented by Lisa Melohusky, Coordinator of Online Learning

Moving a face-to-face course to an online or blended course can be a substantial task, but with a valuable outcome. Online content encourages students to take ownership of their learning and can increase student collaboration. For this breakout session we will look at ways to incorporate learner-centered activities into a digital format and what digital tools can support this technique.
 

The First 6 Weeks
Presented by Jeffrey Janicki, Counselor (Counseling Center); ​David Kinkela, Associate Professor and Honor Program Coordinator (History); Amy Leclair, Coordinator of Academic Advising and Liberal Arts (Registrar); Michael Lemieux, Director of Campus Life; Erin Mroczka, Director of First Year and Transition Programs

Data can indicate in the first six weeks whether a student will stay or go, succeed or fail. How do we facilitate conversations that empower students, connect them early with their learning and with our campus in meaningful ways, build social networks that correlate with academic success and that help all of us together sustain a healthy, thriving campus? Faculty and professional staff from across campus will discuss how data provided by students​ has influenced change in programs and approach to supporting first-year students at Fredonia.​ 

Schedule of Events for Students

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