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Fredonia Foundations Classes By Themes


Creative Thinking & Innovation
 

American Patterns is a creative examination of a narrative of American History. The focus of the course and the pedagogies used will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of American History by exploring the creative production of history using primary and secondary sources written from multiple perspectives. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.
 
What was, and is, a “Great” Society? This question serves as the historical and metaphorical theme as we journey from 1600 to 1968 exploring how and why the United States helps, or doesn’t help, vulnerable citizens. Ideas related to democracy, policy, social contracts, human rights, oppression, social justice, benevolence, and social control are explored.
Introductory course investigating the principles and elements of visual design. Unity, emphasis, balance, scale, line, form, texture, rhythm, and color are explored through two-dimensional studio problems.


Critical Thinking & Analysis

Students will explore, through literature, primary historical texts, and/or other genres and media, central U.S. myths and cultural narratives. Individual sections will examine particular themes chosen by the instructor.
 
This course introduces students to foundational concepts in the study and practice of social justice in American society, historically and at present, and in comparative global perspective. The course can include social justice topics as related to: racism; classism; religious oppression; sexism; heterosexism; transgender oppression; ableism; ageism; and environmentalism. The course will also engage students in the process of putting thought into practice by introducing various research methodologies such as quantitative, qualitative, and cultural studies approaches. Students will explore the course concepts, coupled with research methodologies, to identify and analyze social problems and to use information to formulate and engage in problem-solving strategies for social change. 
 
American Pasts is a critical examination of a narrative of American History. The focus of the course will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of American History by analyzing sources and events from different perspectives. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.
 
This course introduces students to foundational concepts in the study and practice of social justice in American society, historically and at present, and in comparative global perspective. The course can include social justice topics as related to: racism; classism; religious oppression; sexism; heterosexism; transgender oppression; ableism; ageism; and environmentalism. The course will also engage students in the process of putting thought into practice by introducing various research methodologies such as quantitative, qualitative, and cultural studies approaches. Students will explore the course concepts, coupled with research methodologies, to identify and analyze social problems and to use information to formulate and engage in problem-solving strategies for social change. 
 

The course concerns the study and practice of critical thinking through analysis of issues in theoretical philosophy, applied philosophy, and the public sphere more generally. By applying critical thinking skills to controversial issues and dramatic examples, students will engage in careful thought and hone their analytic skills. The primary feature of the course is the consideration of an abundance of issues, examples, and applications from philosophy and everyday life, ranging from human nature to the courtroom and political debate, and from advertising to current moral and social issues.

Discussion of some central problems in philosophy such as the existence of God, the ultimate nature of reality, the conditions for knowledge, the question of free will versus determinism, and the foundations of morality. How should one live? Why would God allow evil? How much can we know about the world around us? Do we have free will? Can we survive death? Such questions are universal and fundamental to all humanity.

The class explores fundamental issues relating to life and death. In particular, it looks at what constitutes life and what, if anything, makes life good. It also investigates what constitutes death and whether death is bad. Using these notions, the class then analyzes particular moral issues surrounding life and death, such as the moral status of the following practices: abortion, suicide, euthanasia, capital punishment, and war.

The course will provide an introduction to human biology and health focusing on genetics (DNA) and biochemistry (proteins). The course will cover the replication and expression of genetic information and the roles of these in diseases. Students will learn about infectious and inherited diseases. The course will cover how scientists have studied diseases and developed treatments for them and what work is currently being done to develop new treatments to disease. The course will have discussions on areas of bioethics.

Human Biology broadly focuses on biological processes important to humans. Students learn about the organization of tissues and organs in the human body, fundamentals of human genetics, physiological processes like blood clotting, and human evolution. In addition, we delve into the biology of important social issues like science communication, genetically modified organisms, genetic disease markers, and vaccines. An overriding focus on science as a process is a unifying theme throughout the course.

Intended to develop an understanding of the operation of biological systems and an acquaintance with basic biological concepts and principles.
 

Basic chemical principles are presented, emphasizing their relationship to environmental problems. The course considers the chemical nature of various substances and their impact on the environment. This course focuses on the processes scientists use and developing critical thinking skills to analyze scientific data and claims.

General Chemistry provides students with an understanding of atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, electronic atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, intermolecular attractions and gas laws. These basic concepts allow one to understand aspects of our everyday life such as how iron rusts, why things dissolve, and how calories are determined in food. The course also introduces some of the most exciting discoveries in science. This course demonstrates how it often takes a collection of scientific analytical data to provide clues to the identity of any unknown, emphasizing the idea that science does not always provide complete and unequivocal answers to all questions at one time. The course also provides context for ways to critically analyze scientific data and theories. General Chemistry is also rich in mathematical problem solving that requires high order thinking and analysis.
 

An introduction to the study of astronomy, from the early historical development of astronomy as a science to our modern understanding of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. The mathematics will be at the level of high school algebra and geometry.
 

Global Pasts is a critical examination of a narrative of Global History. Subjects and pedagogical methods of instruction will vary from semester to semester, but professors will help students develop an understanding of other world civilizations by analyzing sources and events from different perspectives in one or multiple non-Western societies. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.

Study of the organization and functioning of the contemporary American economic system with emphasis on the problems of resource allocation. Topics covered include supply and demand, elasticity, price and output determination in various market situations, competition and public policy, income distribution, and alternative economic systems. 

Study basic principles of educational psychology and sociology, including learning processes, motivation, communication, and classroom management. Introduction to research-validated instructional strategies for teaching students within the full range of abilities. Study the special education process and state and federal special education laws and regulations. Study of the rights and responsibilities of teachers, staff, students, parents, community members, school administrators, and others with regard to education, and the importance of productive relationships and interactions among the school, home, and community for enhancing student learning.

We take a critical examination of the American political system through the lens of current and topical controversies. When major issues arise, what areas of the political system become involved, and how do they respond? Who gets to shape the political response? When do social classes or groups have an impact? When are the institutions themselves reshaped by the dynamics of the controversies?
 

Basic concepts, methods, and points of view in psychology. Specific topics span the range from biological to personal to social determinants of behavior.

Western Pasts features history courses which focus on Europe. The focus of the course will vary semester to semester, but this course will help students develop an understanding of Western Civilization by analyzing sources and events from different perspectives. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.

The proper form of human association, the just balance of economic, political, and social power, and the nature of the relationship between the state and the individual are explored in the works of prominent historical and contemporary theorists. The course examines the nature of social commitment as viewed by major political philosophies.

 

Global Perspectives & Diversity

Students will delve into historical and recent American literature, across multiple genres and in relation to multiple institutions and media, that relates to the experience of “becoming Americans.”
An exploration of the historical construction of American gender, ethnicity/race, and class; their present status; and their literary and cultural representations. Focusing on the intersections between these categories of identity, the course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach, integrating materials from such fields as literary studies, history, gender studies, ethnic studies, geography, sociology, music, and art.
Study of the intellectual and social origins of the discipline known as African American Studies. Key concepts, themes, and theories of the discipline will be discussed in the class.

Non-technical introduction to ethnomusicology. Survey of musical styles from around the world emphasizing how music reflects and influences society.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course ARBC 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course SPAN 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course FREN 100 at Fredonia.

The course Increases proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French. Further development of vocabulary and grammar. Selected cultural materials will provide cultural awareness and cross cultural proficiency to the students.

The course Increases proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French. Further development of vocabulary and grammar. Selected cultural materials will provide cultural awareness and cross cultural proficiency to the students.

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course GERM 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course ITAL 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course RUSS 100 at Fredonia.
 

Students develop essential communicative skills and cultural awareness necessary in order to interact with people from that culture, whether it is in their home country or in the United States.
In order to take this course, students must have scored a level 2 or 3 in the approved placement test or have taken the introductory course SPAN 100 at Fredonia.
 

The course Increases proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Spanish. Further development of vocabulary and grammar. Selected cultural materials will provide cultural awareness and cross cultural proficiency to the students.

The course Increases proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Spanish. Further development of vocabulary and grammar. Selected cultural materials will provide cultural awareness and cross cultural proficiency to the students.

A study of the ways in which writers and others use the written word as a form of social critique and to effect social change.

With a thematic approach, the course will introduce students to the films of a specific country(ies) and/or culture(s). The films will be analyzed as art objects and serve as a text through which students will learn about the history, beliefs, and socio-political issues affecting the culture(s). Films will be watched in the original version with subtitles in order to expose students to the language in which they were shot. The course can be repeated as its content changes.

This class looks at the nature of morality, across and within specific cultures from various parts of the world. Specifically, it looks at the status of moral sentences, what morality is about (right, good, and virtue), and specific moral issues.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the study of LGBTQ American identities, combining historical and literary analysis and methodologies. We will examine major events, developments, themes, and concepts within LGBTQ American history from the nineteenth-century to the present. Sexual orientation and gender identity will also be examined in relation to other marginalized identity positions and systems of privilege and oppression.
 

Study of basic relationships between the environment and humans. Discussion of constraints and relationships in nature from points of view of the physical and life sciences and investigation of how people make decisions to utilize the environment as a resource from the viewpoint of the social sciences. Attempts to link natural and social sciences for awareness of multifaceted nature of environmental problems.

In today’s world, with increasing global population, shifting climate and a growing demand for raw materials and energy, a basic understanding of the earth as a system is more important than ever. ESS aims to illustrate the interconnectedness and complexities of the planet’s principal subsystems of hydrologic, atmospheric, biologic and geologic processes and their impact on shaping the planet and the lives of humans.

An introduction to the study of international and domestic media systems around the world. Students will understand and appreciate how different countries and cultures use the media in unique ways and learn of different systems of ownership, financing, regulation, and programming. Key international media issues will also be discussed. Media examples (primarily films) will be used to show how cultures are portrayed by their media. 

Global Perspectives focuses on the history of non-Western regions of the world. Subjects and pedagogical methods of instruction will vary from semester to semester, but professors will help students develop an understanding of other world civilizations by using a global and multicultural perspective, focusing on long-term processes and individual patterns via case studies drawn from Africa, the Americas, and Eurasia. Refer to the History Department website for specific topics/focus.
 

This course focuses on how we compare different societies from a political perspective. Issues such as economic development, political system, government structure, representation, political culture, and state capacity are discussed by examining in greater depth particular country cases from both the industrialized and developing world as well as those with different degrees of democratic practice and values.

An introduction to social demography, the course provides an overview of the three basic demographic processes: fertility, mortality, and migration. It evaluates the relationships among these population processes and their interaction with population structures and characteristics, such as age, sex, marital status, race/ethnicity, social class and religion. It also examines contemporary social issues associated with the population processes, including equality, aging, urbanization, women and household structure, economic development and environmental concerns.

The course provides an introduction to micro- and macroeconomic concepts and global economic history with a special emphasis on the ability to weave those basic tools of analysis into the presentation of a narrative of global history.

This course will examine the topic of transnational crime in our globalized world. Students will be introduced to various types of transnational crimes including drug trafficking, stolen property, counterfeiting, human trafficking, fraud and cyber-crime, commercial vices, extortion and racketeering, money laundering and corruption, and international terrorism.
 

Studies key reasons for how and why countries behave as they do in international politics taking into account the world diversity in politics, cultures, historic trajectories and different levels of economic development. International Relations and Political Science theories and the research methods in the Social Sciences are applied to enhance the understanding of complex global issues such as human rights violations, ethnic conflict, large migration flows, environmental decay, human insecurity, and terrorism with an emphasis on world’s increasing interdependence.
 

This course examines the philosophical and sociological foundations of sport in a global society. Through lecture, small and large group discussions, film, personal reflection, and research, students will explore the cultural contributions, challenges and outcomes diverse populations have provided to global sport. Students will be challenged to reflect upon how sport has been influenced by various cultures and diverse groups to develop their own personal philosophy and explore current issues in sport through this historical lens.
 

A comprehensive introduction to aspects of Spanish civilization and culture: geography, history, social customs, political movements, literature and art. In English.

A survey of major scientific discoveries, the effect that these discoveries have had on the progress of civilizations, and the relationship between culture, and science.

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