A row of books.

English Adolescence Education Courses

Students enrolled in the Adolescence Education - English undergraduate program or the Adolescence Education - English Multi-Award Bachelor and Master of Arts program take a variety of literature content, education, and pedagogy classes. Below is the list of English Education classes offered in Fall 2022.  Please see the University Catalog for a complete list of courses offered by our department.  

ENED 353 Reading/Writing Children's Literature 

Prof. Jeremy Daley-Griffin

M 6:00-8:20

A study of children's picture storybooks and their use across the elementary school curriculum, combined with the craft of writing stories for children and the art of teaching story writing to them.

 

ENED 355 Adolescent Literature

 

Prof. Heather McEntarfer

MWF 2:00-2:50

In this course, we'll read a range of books written for adolescents. We will also discuss the genre of YA lit and ways to teach literature with middle and high schoolers--though the strategies we explore will also be relevant with younger students. In addition, we will engage in conversations related to various forms of identity.  This class counts in the Genres category of the English major.
ENED 357 Literacy/ Language/Learning Theory

Prof. Scott Johnston

TR 12:30-1:50

Study of philosophical, sociological, and psychological theories of language, linguistics, and learning theories used to explore the nature of the reading process, how people learn to read, how people make meaning from print and other media, and how teachers might help students become more capable readers. This class counts in the Theoretical Approaches category of the English major.
ENED 358 Teaching Writing Intermed. Grades

Prof. Marie Davis

T 5:00-7:20

Analysis of the writing process as it applies to elementary students. Approaches to teaching writing as a means of learning throughout the elementary-school curriculum.
ENED 413 Teaching Shakespeare

Prof. Ann Siegle Drege

TR 11:00-12:20

Whether you're interested in reading, teaching, or directing Shakespeare's plays, this class gives you the pedagogical tools to delve into the plays yourself and engage others.  We will concentrate on a few plays commonly taught in high school classrooms and then work with them in depth, exploring a range of interactive strategies where we learn that the heart of each play is the language.  This class counts in the Major Author category of and fulfills the pre-1800 requirement for the English major
ENED 450 Sem. for Teachers of English - ADOL

Prof. Scott Johnston

TR 3:30-4:50

This course is designed to be a workshop that will immerse you in the processes of preparing secondary students to read, write about, analyze, and discuss drama, fiction, and poetry. There is an emphasis on pre-reading activities, construction of discussion questions and classroom activities, development of a major unit for teaching literature, and participation in micro-teaching activities. For the most part, class time will be used  to give you some new ideas about English and teaching, and generally working together in order to become the kind of professionals we need to be.
ENED 451 Methods

Prof. Ann Siegle Drege

W 5:00-7:20

This course will build on the work you have done in the program in your English literature, composition, language, and pedagogy classes to help you develop the theories and skills to teach.  Through a combination of classwork, reading, writing, and field experiences, you will prepare to teach a variety of students and do a great deal of reflecting on your teaching. Plan for blocks of time in your schedule in order to be out in your two placements.

ENED 535 Topics in Teaching Diversity

Prof. Heather McEntarfer

Section 01 MWF 10:00-10:50

Section 02 MWF 3:00-3:50

This class will use a combination of narrative, research, and theoretical texts to open up conversations related to diversity and identity in schools, with a LIKELY emphasis on disability. 
ENED 560 Sem. in English Ed.: Theory/Practice

Prof. Scott Johnston

TR 3:30-4:50

In this course, students will refine their philosophies of English Education by examining these central questions: What is the discipline of English? What subjects and processes does it include? Why do we require students to take twelve or more years of it? What does it mean to teach and to learn in general and in English? How do my experiences as an Adolescence English Education major at Fredonia affect the ways I answer these questions?
ENED 561 Graduate Methods

Prof. Ann Siegle Drege

W 5:00-7:20

In Methods, you'll build on the work you have done as an undergraduate in your English literature, composition, language, and pedagogy classes and draw on the graduate courses you have taken, synthesizing the theory and beginning to put into practice the methods/approaches to teaching that you have learned through the program. Through a combination of classwork, advanced reading and research, writing, and field experiences, you will prepare to teach a variety of students and reflect on your teaching. 
ENED 665 Studies in English Education

Prof. Marie Davis

R 5:30-7:50

Study of components of English with emphasis chosen from linguistics, criticism, composition, media, and/or learning theories. Focus is on the implications for teaching English at the secondary level.

 

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