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Fredonia Foundations

A blue graduation cap.The English Department contributes several courses to SUNY Fredonia's general education program, Fredonia Foundations. Go to YourConnection to search for all university courses by Fredonia Foundations theme and category.


Fall 2022 Fredonia Foundations Course Offerings

None of these classes count towards majors within the department except where indicated.

Critical Thinking & Analysis/American History 

Prof. Susan McGee

Section 01 TR 9:30-10:50

Section 03 TR 11:00-12:20

Students will explore, through literature, primary historical texts, and/or other genres and media, central U.S. myths and cultural narratives. Individual sections will examine particular themes chosen by the instructor.
Prof. Anne Fearman Section 02 MWF 10:00-10:50 Students will explore, through literature, primary historical texts, and/or other genres and media, central U.S. myths and cultural narratives. Individual sections will examine particular themes chosen by the instructor.

 

Creativity & Innovation/Arts 

Prof. Alison Pipitone  Section 01 Internet-Based Course This online, asynchronous course asks students to consider songwriting in several ways. First, we will explore the fundamental aspects of the sound of songwriting, including melody, rhythm, hooks, arrangement, and production. We will also consider the lyric with a focus on word choice, rhyme, image, tone, and Voice. We will also explore the role that songs have in reflecting and influencing our culture.

 

Critical Thinking & Analysis/Humanities 

Prof. Emily Van Dette

Section 01 Internet-Based Course

Section 02 TR 9:30-10:50

This course explores the constructions and representations of animals throughout history. In addition to studying literary representations of animals, the course will include artistic, cinematic, and digital media representations of animals, as well as philosophical, historical, and eco-critical discussions about the status of animals in society. Through our study of the animal and animality, we will ultimately examine constructions of humanity and enduring questions about the human experience.
Prof. Daniel Laurie Section 03 TR 12:30-1:50 Students will explore constructions of humanity and enduring questions about the human experience through inquiry into thematic readings of literature, film, and/or other genres and media.

 

Global Perspectives & Diversity/Other World Civilizations 

Prof. Birger

Vanwesenbeeck

Section 01 Internet-Based Course Study of a range of world literature, across multiple genres, that relates to the experience of the process of “Border Crossings.”

Prof. Ici

Vanwesenbeeck

 

Section 02 W 4:30-6:50

Honors Internet-Based Course


 
This course aims at exploring the experiences of homelessness and displacement in literature, especially in current climate hot spots and conflict zones in the Middle East and North Africa. Students will study literary narratives (multi-genre) about homelessness, displacement, memory, nostalgia, melancholia, in specific relation to war and armed conflict.

 

Critical Thinking & Analysis/Humanities 

Prof. Ann Siegle Drege

 

Section 02 T 3:30-6:30 R 4:40-5:20

 

How do choices made on stage or on screen inform our interpretations? As we explore the conventions of film and drama, we'll consider them through the lens of journeys for individuals and communities. A unique and powerful aspect of dramatic literature is that plays in production become communal experiences, and films screened together also create a shared experience.  Together we will wrestle with what it means to be human through the work on stage and screen, discovering that it is heightened by experiencing it together and reflecting on it in collaborative ways. This class counts as an elective in the English major.


 

 

Prof. Saundra Liggins

Section 01 MWF 1:00-1:50

Section 02 MWF 2:00-2:50

This class is an exploration of the historical construction of American gender, ethnicity/race, and class; their present status; and their literary and cultural representations. Focusing on intersections between these categories of identity, the course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach, integrating materials from fields such as literary studies, history, gender studies, ethnic studies, geography, sociology, music, and art.  This class counts in the Literature & Identities category of the English major.

 

Creativity & Innovation/Arts 

Prof. Rebecca Cuthbert

 

Section 01 TR 12:30-1:50

Section 02 MWF 2:00-2:50

Section 08 MWF 1:00-1:50

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher-level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments

Prof. Neil Fitzpatrick

 

Section 03  TR 12:30-1:50

Section 04 TR 3:30-4:50

This class is about becoming readers and writers of fiction and poetry. The focus will be on learning craft through practice: we will write fiction and poetry exercises that lead to longer works. We will share these works and learn to give and receive feedback. We will read contemporary literary fiction and poetry, both to see what published writers can teach us and to mine the pleasures found there. This is writing as discovery, both in terms of what the poem or story is about and what we’re about.

Prof. Shannon Jonas

Section 05 MW 3:00-4:20

Section 06 MW 4:30-5:50

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher-level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments.
Prof. Michael Sheehan Section 07 MWF 10:00-10:50 This class serves as an introduction to what creative writers do. We will be working on the foundations of creative writing across genres—poetry and fiction, as well as creative nonfiction, playwriting, graphic narrative—and doing so via frequent, short exercises. The class will also include readings, discussions, and in-class peer review (workshops).

 

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