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Writing Courses

Writing classes in our department offer students workshops in beginning, intermediate, and advanced poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction writing. Students also engage in the advanced study of the form and theory of writing and have the opportunity to be involved in Fredonia's undergraduate literary journal or internships. Below is the list of writing courses offered in Fall 2022. Please see the University Catalog for a complete list of courses in every department.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Rebecca Cuthbert

Section 01 TR 12:30-1:50

Section 02 MWF 2:00-2:50

Section 08 MWF 1:00-1:50

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher-level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Neil Fitzpatrick

Section 03 TR 12:30-1:50

Section 04 TR 3:30-4:50

The focus of this class will be on learning craft through practice: we will write fiction and poetry exercises that lead to longer works. We will share these works and learn to give and receive feedback. We will read contemporary literary fiction and poetry, both to see what published writers can teach us and to mine the pleasures found there.  This is writing as discovery, both in terms of what the poem or story is about and what we’re about.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Shannon Jonas

Section 05 MW 3:00-4:20

Section 06 MW 4:30-5:50

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher-level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through the study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Michael Sheehan

Section 07

MWF 10:10:50

This class serves as an introduction to what creative writers do. We will be working on the foundations of creative writing across genres—poetry and fiction, as well as creative nonfiction, playwriting, graphic narrative—and doing so via frequent, short exercises. The class will also include readings, discussions, and in-class peer review (workshops).
WRTG 354 Foundations of Editing

Prof. Natalie Gerber

TR 9:30-10:50

The primary emphasis will be upon learning the principles and tasks of copyediting (e.g., marking manuscripts, developing style sheets, writing queries, and communicating with authors) and applying these principles via a collaborative final project for a partner. Students will learn how to produce clear, consistent, cohesive, and correct content that meets the needs of various professional, community, and personal contexts.  This class counts in the Rhetorical Writing category of the English major.

WRTG 362 Intermediate Poetry

Prof. Shannon Jonas

T 4:00-6:20

Continued study of forms, techniques, genres, and theories of poetry. Emphasis on further development of students' skills in writing and self-criticism through intensive workshop experience. Readings in contemporary poetry.
WRTG 363 Intermediate Creative Non-fiction Writing

Prof. Heather McEntarfer

MWF 10:00-10:50

Study of forms, techniques, genres, and theories of creative nonfiction writing and the differences with other rhetorical styles of nonfiction. Emphasis on further development of students’ skills in writing and self-criticism through intensive workshop experience. Readings in contemporary creative nonfiction. Permission of instructor.
WRTG 365 Form and Theory of Writing

Prof. Michael Sheehan

TR 11:00-12:20

In this course, we will look at examples of contemporary fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as recent (and less recent) examples of hypertext, interactive essays, video games, installations, podcasts, and other forms. Although we will discuss literary theory and talk to writers, our project will be to respond creatively to what we read, see, and hear. This includes responses to the works of other students as we create a group project to be experienced by others on campus.
WRTG 367 Advanced Composition

Prof. Scott Johnston

MW 3:00-4:20

Building on the work done in ENGL100, this is a writing workshop course in which students compose papers in argumentation, exposition, and narration. As part of the workshop, they will analyze, respond to, and edit the work of others. There will also be an emphasis on developing informational literacy, which includes gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing multiple sources in order to support or refute a claim. Students will also read professional texts that focus on advanced composing techniques, conventions, and styles.
WRTG 374 Writing and Social Change

Prof. Birger Vanwesenbeeck

Internet-Based Course

This writing-intensive course will use a variety of methods, materials, and rhetorical approaches to explore and respond to contemporary social change issues such as sustainability, democracy, social justice, and community engagement. In addition to literary works and nonfiction texts, students will analyze film, Internet, popular press and social media sources to evaluate the effectiveness of different writing/communication genres and to help them engage in several real-world writing projects. This class counts in the Rhetorical Writing category of the English major.
WRTG 399 Special Topics: Screenwriting

Prof. Neil Fitzpatrick

TR 11:00-12:20

This is an introductory course in screenwriting, with a particular emphasis on narrative craft. Students will read screenplays, write scenes, critique each other’s work, and ultimately write the script for either act I of a feature film or the entirety of a short film. We will cover coming up with ideas, outlining, plot, action, dialogue, and finishing scripts (among other things). The class may also include visits from working screenwriters, plus discussions of pitching and production.
WRTG 399 Special Topics: Speculative Fiction 

Prof. Rebecca Cuthbert

TR 2:00-3:20

Variable-content course; topic announced in the online Course Offerings each semester.
WRTG 461 Advanced Fiction Writing

Prof. Michael Sheehan

TR 12:30-1:50

Our topic for this course will be the short novel. We will read a selection of short novels and look at passages from many more, along with craft essays. You will start the draft of a short novel. This will be accomplished by submitting ~10 page chapters on a regular basis. These will follow our discussions of the form and of process, along with a number of exercises to help you navigate the structure of the novel.
WRTG 465 Writing Internship

Prof. Michael Sheehan

Days and Times TBD

Writing internships. Interns work 40 hours for 1 credit hour. Enrollment requires a completed Learning Contract and permission of the department.

 

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