A row of books.

Writing Courses

Writing classes in our department offer students workshops in beginning, intermediate, and advanced poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction writing. Students also engage in the advanced study of the form and theory of writing and have the opportunity to be involved in Fredonia's undergraduate literary journal or internships. Below is the list of writing courses offered in Spring 2024. Please see the University Catalog for a complete list of courses in every department.

WRTG 260
Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Rebecca Cuthbert

Section 01
MWF
10:00-10:50

Section 02
MWF
11:00-11:50

 

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher-level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Jason Bussman

Section 04
MWF
9:00-9:50

 

Section 05
MWF
10:00-10:50

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, WRTG 260 is the prerequisite for all higher level creative writing. The focus of this course is to provide practical experience in writing and evaluating across multiple genres, including fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry. The workshop-oriented design of Intro to Creative Writing is to provide you with a community of writing peers. This is the process of writing as discovery, where you will learn to challenge yourself and take risks in your own writing.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing

Prof. Shannon Jonas

Section 06
MW
4:30-5:50

Section 07
MW
3:00 - 4:20

By the end of the semester, you will be required to write and submit 2 short stories and 4 poems. Ideally, we’ll have time to workshop at least 1 of the stories you each write. We’ll workshop as a class at least 1 of your 4 poems, but ideally all 4. The creative work you submit during the arc of the semester will be the basis of your final portfolio that you will turn in at the end of the semester.

WRTG 260 Introduction to Creative Writing Honors

Michael Sheehan

Section HR
MWF
1:00-1:50

First in the sequence of creative writing courses, the prerequisite for all higher-level creative writing. Conducted in an informal workshop format, the course provides practical experience in the writing and evaluation of poetry and short fiction. Basic forms, prosodies, techniques, genres, and the problems they pose are considered through study of historical and contemporary examples, and through writing assignments.

WRTG 261 Intro to Writing Professions

Dr. Susan Spangler

Section 01
MWF
1:00-1:50

Students develop their rhetorical awareness and learn valuable lessons about the writing process and about how to connect writing skills to professional qualifications in a supportive environment.

WRTG 299 Special Topics: Writing for RPG's

Shawn Merwin

Section 01
TR 
11:00-12:20

In this course, we examine roleplaying games (RPGs) in terms of the writing that forms and drives them. We look at how roleplaying games are constructed, how their rules act as facilitators of both experiences and narratives, and how diverse types of writing are needed to create them. Various types of games are studied, from simple interactive fiction games to complex rules systems like Dungeons & Dragons.

WRTG 361 Intermediate Fiction Writing

 

Rebecca Cuthbert

Section 01
MW
3:00-4:20

Continued study of forms techniques genres and theories of fiction writing. Emphasis on further development of students' skills in writing and self-criticism through intensive workshop experience. Readings in contemporary fiction.

WRTG 361 Intermediate Fiction Writing

Michael Sheehan

Section 02
TR
12:30-1:50

Continued study of forms techniques genres and theories of fiction writing. Emphasis on further development of students' skills in writing and self-criticism through intensive workshop experience. Readings in contemporary fiction.

WRTG 364
Literary Publishing

 

Michael Sheehan

Section 01
MWF
11:00-11:50

 

This course is designed as a practicum for students interested in literary publishing. The central focus of the course is the production of The Trident the undergraduate literary journal at Fredonia. Over the course of this semester this class will advertise solicit screen and file manuscripts handle rejection and acceptance letters design edit and prepare a volume of The Trident for publication. We will discuss national literary journals both online and in print

WRTG 372
Grammar and Style for Writers

Dr. KimMarie Cole

Section 01
MWF
2:00-2:50

This course helps writers move beyond notions of "correctness" in matters of grammar and style to appreciate the nuances involved in crafting well-written persuasive prose for a variety of audiences purposes and contexts. It empowers students to approach grammar syntax and punctuation as rhetorical tools and to make thoughtful decisions among equally acceptable alternatives to suit the goals and needs of different audiences assignments and contexts. Because professional writers often work for an organization or institution the course also introduces students to the notion of a style guide preparing them to work with whatever house style is adopted by a specific profession or publication.

WRTG 374
Writing and Social Change

Prof. Birger Vanwesenbeek


Section 01
ONLINE

This writing-intensive online course will explore, through both theory and practice, the rhetorical modalities that have shaped the modern tradition of activist discourse, from the open letter and the “we-essay” to the first-person essay and the contemporary podcast. Our thematic focus will be on issues pertaining to racial, social, and environmental justice as well as on the perception and reception of difference more generally.

WRTG 455 Writing Tutors

Dr. Scott Johnston

Section 01
MWF
2:00-2:50

Students in this course will examine the theory and practice of writing tutoring. We will also
spend time on issues related to tutoring including diversity, technology, collaboration, and the
writing process. Students will also spend time each week engaged in writing tutoring at the
Learning Center. Permission of instructor required.

WRTG 462
Advanced Poetry Workshop

Shannon Jonas

Section 01
T
4:00-6:20

Intensive critical discussion of student work. Readings in contemporary poetry. The orientation of the course is professional and the students are expected to submit their work to periodicals for publication. Oral presentation of student work.

WRTG 463
Advanced CNF Workshop

Dr. Heather McEntarfer

Section 01
MWF
1:00-1:50

Intensive critical discussion of student creative nonfiction. Readings in contemporary nonfiction. The orientation of the course is professional and students are expected to submit their work to periodicals for publication. In this class you will be working independently writing and submitting essays that demonstrate your abilities and personal aesthetic.

WRTG 465
Writing Internship

Prof. Michael Sheehan

TBA

Writing internships. Interns work 40 hours for 1 credit hour. Enrollment requires a completed Learning Contract and permission of the department.

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