A row of books.

English Courses

English classes in our department range from general survey courses to classes that offer a more in-depth look at a literary genre, writer, literary time period, and theoretical approach. Below is the list of English courses offered in Spring 2023. Please see the University Catalog for a complete list of courses offered by our department.

ENGL 106 Introduction to Literary Studies

Prof. David Kaplin


MWF 11:00-11:50

Students will gain insight into close reading techniques, analytical frameworks, and the multiple functions and genres of literature and writing. Learning how to express your analyses clearly and forcefully will also increase your credibility in and outside the classroom.

ENGL 124 American Fictions

Prof. Anne Fearman

MWF 10:00-10:50

Students will explore, through literature, primary historical texts, and/or other genres and media, central U.S. myths and cultural narratives. Individual sections will examine particular themes chosen by the instructor.

ENGL 127 
Becoming Americans

Prof. Mary Heyl

Online

Students will delve into historical and recent American literature, across multiple genres and in relation to multiple institutions and media, that relates to the experience of "becoming Americans."
 

ENGL 132 Word and Sound

Prof. Alison Pipitone

Section 01
Online


Section 02
Restricted to Honors Students
Online

This writing-intensive course examines how creative writers often manipulate sound patterns to capture our attention; through critical and creative assignments, it explores the rhetorical and emotional impact of the sounds of words, as well as other sounds found in and out of language. Students will study the play and purpose of sound in artistic texts and create original works utilizing sound for expressive and/or persuasive purposes. Examples may include song lyrics, spoken word, poems for page and/or performance, advertisements, musicals, oratory, and experimental traditions.
 

ENGL 144 Reading Humanity

Prof. Daniel Laurie

TR 2:00-3:20

This section of Reading Humanity focuses on group dynamics and the sense of belonging. The key questions we will consider are: What does it mean to belong? What does it mean to be an outsider? And what’s at stake in conformity?

ENGL 167 Border Crossing

Prof. Ici Vanwesenbeeck

Section 01 Online


Section 02
Online


Section 03
Online

Study of a range of world literature, across multiple genres, that relates to the experience of the process of “Border Crossings.”
 

ENGL 206 Survey of American Literature

Prof. Bruce Simon

TR 2:00-3:20

The study of major texts from origins to the present in American literature. Will include divergent approaches to texts, the historical development of the literatures, and the relationships between literature and other disciplines.
 

ENGL 213
Text and Context

Prof. Scott Johnston

Section 01
TR 3:00-4:20 

Texts and Contexts is a writing-intensive course designed to introduce students to the process of research-based writing intended for a range of audiences and rhetorical situations. Students will undertake a series of writing projects that engage writing process elements, from completing pre-writing strategies to locating, assessing, integrating, and properly citing research sources; to drafting, revising, and proofreading final copy. Through reading like writers, students will learn to evaluate and construct logical arguments and to explore questions related to the contexts of writing, such as audience, genre, and historical or political moment. The course will culminate in a significant research-based writing project.

ENGL 213
Text and Context

Prof. Birger Vanwesenbeeck

Section 02
T 3:30-5:50

 

 

Texts and Contexts is a writing-intensive course designed to introduce students to the process of research-based writing intended for a range of audiences and rhetorical situations. Students will undertake a series of writing projects that engage writing process elements, from completing pre-writing strategies to locating, assessing, integrating, and properly citing research sources; to drafting, revising, and proofreading final copy. Through reading like writers, students will learn to evaluate and construct logical arguments and to explore questions related to the contexts of writing, such as audience, genre, and historical or political moment. The course will culminate in a significant research-based writing project.

ENGL 242 American Indian Literature

Prof. Bernadette Franklin

MW 3:00-4:20

Study of a variety of works, including traditional tales, novels, poems and memoirs, produced by American Indians from historical beginnings to the present. Cross-listed with ETHN 242.
 

ENGL 274
Social Justice and the Written Word

Prof. Christina Jarvis

Section 01
TR 9:30-10:50

Section 02
TR 2:00-3:20

Adopting a historical and topical approach, English 274 will explore key U.S. social justice movements and voices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. In addition to examining central principles, strategies, and ideas from these movements, we will analyze the societal factors and individual and group identities that inspired people to create social change.

ENGL 296 Honors American Identities

Prof. Saundra Liggins

Restricted to Honors Students

MWF 10:00-10:50

In this class we will examine the nature of the American identity over time, asking the main question, What does it mean to be American? Our readings, screenings, discussions, and assignments will help us to analyze how governmental policies, institutions, and beliefs shape an individual’s and a community’s sense of their national and personal identities.

ENGL 306 Middle Eastern Literature

Prof. Ici Vanwesenbeeck

Online

This survey course will offer a study of Middle Eastern literatures from antiquity to the present. The central goal of the course is to introduce the students to the trends and genres in Middle Eastern literatures and to offer them an overview of the historical, literary, and cultural setting of some of the canonical literary texts. Particular emphasis will be given to a broad understanding of the interaction between religion, history, and literature in the Middle East. All readings will be in English translation.
 

ENGL 314 Women Writers

Prof. Susan McGee

TR 8:00-9:20

An in-depth study of literature by women. The course explores questions regarding gender, language, perception, and experience through various genres. Cross-listed as WOST 314.
 

ENGL 315 Gothic Literature

Prof. Saundra Liggins

MWF 1:00-1:50

This course will explore Gothic literature from the genre's classical texts such as Dracula to more non-traditional narratives. Through our examination of Gothic conventions - the haunted castle/house, the damsel in distress, the evil patriarch, to name just a few - we will also examine the nature of individual and societal fears.

ENGL 326 Victorian Literature 

Prof. David Kaplin

MWF 2:00-2:50

Introduction to later 19th century English poetry and prose; emphasis on relationship between social-intellectual history and literature. Topics include problems of rapid industrialization, impact of science and technology, pressures for increased democratization, impact of laissez-faire capitalism, and relationship of the literature to 19th century music, painting, and architecture.

ENGL 381 Narrative Film After 1940

Prof. Shannon McRae

 

T 6:00-9:00 and 
R 6:00-7:00

 

In this class, students study films made from WWII to the present, within a historical, cultural, aesthetic and economic context. As intersections of art, technology and commerce, films express the preoccupations of the time and place in which they are made. We'll therefore be looking at several film genres from various countries from technical, artistic, historical and cultural perspectives

ENGL 387 American Film Directors

Prof. Shannon McRae

T 3:00-6:00
and
R 3:00-4:00

This course is an in-depth study of Alfred Hitchcock and David Lynch, as innovators and auteurs. Working within the Hollywood studio system and its established formal and narrative norms, both directors redefined conventions of American filmmaking. We'll be watching and discussing their films in class, with an eye toward signature styles, definitive themes, and characteristic artistic concerns.

ENGL 399 Special Topic:The Campus Garden

Prof. Christina Jarvis

TBA

Through supervised, experiential research, students will plan, grow, and publicize the campus garden, while also writing grants and creating the infrastructure for its long-term sustainability.

ENGL 400
Senior Seminar

Prof. Christina Jarvis

TR 12:30-1:50

This capstone course will provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their learning experiences in the major and to explore the roles of literature and writing in the world today. In addition to completing some professional writing and community engagement projects, we will examine the ways scholars, activists, and authors are responding to contemporary issues, such as book banning; social, racial, and environmental justice; and the human impacts of digital technologies and social media platforms.

ENGL 408
Arthurian Literature

Prof. Shannon McRae

TR 11:00-12:20

This course will discuss Arthurian literature as a continuing shared Western European tradition. Beginning with its antecedents in early medieval Welsh and Irish literature and British historical legend, we will move to the emergence of Arthurian tales on the Continent, Malory's eventual consolidation and canonization of the tradition, and contemporary revisions. We'll be discussing issues such as courtly love, speculations concerning the esoteric dimensions of the tales, ways that different cultures in different historical periods appropriate and revise legendary material to suit specific purposes, depictions of gender, and modernization.

ENGL 427
Hawthorne and Morrison

Prof. Bruce Simon

TR 9:30-10:50

 

ENGL 435
Undergraduate Research

Prof. Birger Vanwesenbeeck

TBA

Undergraduate Research is an opportunity to conduct research in the fields of English. Students will join a research team with a specific focus and carry out the research tasks that will lead to submission of presentations or publications.
 

ENGL 465
English Internships

Prof. KimMarie Cole

TBA

English internships. Interns work 40 hours for 1 credit hour. Enrollment requires a completed Learning Contract and permission of the department.
 

ENGL 514 
Comparative Approaches to Literature

Prof. Ici Vanwesenbeeck

R 4:00-6:20

Study of literary works from different time periods, nations, or cultures.
 

ENGL 520
Lit and Culture

Prof. Saundra Liggins

MW 3:00-4:20

In the past few years, the teaching of African-American literature has been the subject of political and social debate. In this class we will read and discuss African-American literature appropriate for the 7-12 ELA classroom and examine the historical and contemporary "controversies" associated with the literature.

 

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