James Foley, Writers @ Work

Mark Anthony Neal

Writers @ Work welcomes author, activist, NPR Commentator, and Duke University professor Dr. Mark Anthony Neal to campus this Sunday, February 19, and Monday, February 20, for a series of talks and workshops.

 

Don’t miss these exciting and free events:

 

  • Sunday, Feb. 19: “Will You [Tweet] About Me?”: In the Afterlife of Digital Blackness. A public talk exploring issues of activism and social media. 7-8 p.m.; Williams Center MPR. Free and open to all campus and community members. Refreshments will be served.

  • Monday, Feb. 20: Teaching Social Justice from the Analog to the Digital Era. A lecture and discussion centered on the interplay between social justice and the digital humanities. 11:55 a.m.-12:15 p.m. and 12:30-12:50 p.m. (offered twice); Diers Recital Hall (Mason Hall). Free and open to all campus and community members.

  • Monday, Feb. 20: Twitter Activism: How to Craft a Powerful Statement in 140 Characters or Less. An opportunity to learn first-hand from Dr. Neal, who regularly blogs, podcasts, and serves as a commentator for NPR. 6-7 p.m.; English Reading Room/Fenton 127. Free and open to all college and secondary-school students. Refreshments will be served.

 

Dr. Neal is a Professor of African + African-American Studies and Professor of English at Duke University where he teaches courses in Black Cultural Studies, including signature courses on “Michael Jackson and the Black Performance Tradition” and “The History of Hip-Hop,” co-taught with Grammy Award—Winning Producer 9th Wonder. Dr. Neal has authored five books, including Soul Babies: Black Popular Culture and the Post-Soul Aesthetic and Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities. He also hosts Left of Black, a weekly video podcast produced in collaboration with the John Hope Franklin Center of International and Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke. Learn more about Dr. Neal by following him on twitter and instagram, both of which he uses for activism and political commentary. Also watch his Tedx Talk, “A History of Black Folk on Twitter”:

 

 

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